Category Archives: Enrollment

Keeping Current: Some Dos and Don’ts

“I don’t really have time to watch the news.”

“I don’t think this stuff really affects me.”  

“I don’t really understand it so why bother?”

I’m sure we’ve all said some version of these at one point in our lives. I get it, we’re busy, we have a lot on our plates, and there really is A LOT going on in the world. It can be difficult to keep up, especially in an election year. But the truth is, staying informed doesn’t have to be that hard. Here are a few do’s and don’ts to help you out. 

Do make the choice to stay informed

It might be easier to just focus on your schoolwork or your job and not worry about anything else. However, it’s actually pretty important to know what’s going on in the world. Even the things you don’t think directly affect you, probably do, or at least someone you care about so it’s essential to know what is taking place in our country and around the world and to understand your rights.

Don’t rely on hearsay

It’s totally ok to seek other’s opinions, especially people who you trust and respect, but don’t just take someone’s word for granted, educate yourself and form your own opinions. 

Do read newspapers and watch the news 

make sure you are getting your news from a legitimate news source. There is a lot of misinformation out there. If you don’t enjoy watching the news, and you don’t get the newspaper, there are other ways to learn about what’s happening around you. Visit some news sites online every few days or follow accounts like the BBC or your hometown news station on Twitter.

Don’t rely on headlines

Don’t trust yourself to gather information from headlines or simple tweets. As someone who writes a lot of headlines and tweets for work, they’re created with the intention to be catchy or shocking, to grab your attention. So …

Do dig deeper 

As I said above, don’t rely on headlines and simple tweets to give you the facts. Dig deeper and learn a bit more. If you don’t understand a topic, do a little research for an informed opinion 

Author’s favorite tip

Do check in on yourself

Right now more than ever, the news is full of some overwhelmingly scary information. If you find yourself feeling anxious every time you open your Twitter app, take a break. Limit yourself to 15 min. of news each night and follow it up with some great cat videos on Youtube!

 

Social Media Tips To Keep In Mind

By: Ally Romanes

Right now we all have a lot of extra time on our hands and most of us find ourselves spending a good chunk of that time on social media. I’m positive you’ve all heard professors or parents telling you to be intelligent about what you post but another reminder couldn’t hurt! The first thing a lot of us do when we meet or are about to meet someone is, look them up! We all do it. A person’s social media is a representation of them, a brand if you will. It can play a role in getting into a school or getting a job. It’s important to make sure you put your best foot forward. Here are a few things to consider about your social media platforms. 

Make a good first impression

The first thing anyone sees when they land on your page is your profile photo! Make sure your photo is appropriate. I’m not suggesting everyone needs a headshot in a suit and tie as their default photo, obviously, you should have fun and express yourself how you want but it’s good to keep a few things in mind like making sure your face is visible and on a platform like LinkedIn it’s definitely a good idea to aim for as professional as possible.

Browse through your profile

Take a look at your viewable photos and videos. Pay close attention to things you might be tagged in. Look through your older posts and comments for things that may not reflect the person you are or want to be. 

Adjust your privacy settings 

I’m sure you know this already, young people are always on top of technology, but you can change your social media settings to not allow your profile to be tagged in photos or videos without your approval. You can also set it so people cannot comment on your FB timeline without approval. If you’ve found you are often being tagged in something you aren’t happy with, consider adjusting your settings. I changed mine simply because my best friend has a habit of posting the absolute ugliest photos of me.  

Update your bio!

Make sure you have current information on your page. As someone who uses social media for work often, I can’t tell you how many times I’ve taken to Facebook to look for someone’s contact information. 

Keep it professional 

Or at least use proper grammar! I don’t have anything else to say except I really like proper grammar and you should too! At least download Grammarly to give you a helping hand because no one wants to be the person whose posts get comments correcting which version of “there” they incorrectly used!

What you post online reflects who you are. Be smart about what you post because your future professor or boss might see it. Use social media to help you, not hurt you.  

 

An Inside Look at PUC’s Emergency Services Programs

The emergency services programs at PUC prepare students to be highly skilled professionals in the emergency and fire responder fields. If you’re considering a career in the fire service, law enforcement, disaster relief, or emergency medical services, a degree in emergency services from PUC may be for you. 

You might have some questions about the EMS programs at PUC. Well, we have answers!

Jeff Joiner has been working at PUC as an associate professor of nursing & emergency services for five years now and he was gracious enough to answer a few of our burning questions. 

You’ve now taught at PUC for a few years. What’s been your favorite thing about teaching here? 

I think my favorite thing as a teacher is seeing what my graduates are doing after graduation. Whether it’s working as an EMT in a big city or small rural area, getting that first paid position as a firefighter or heading back to school to advance their career as a paramedic or a graduate degree.

The EMS program at PUC has been around for over 10 years now. What exciting things are in store for the program in the future?

We’ve got lots of ideas on new courses to add to our program to keep it up to date with current standards of Emergency Management education (and make our graduates better prepared). We’ve recently added a new course in Search & Rescue and are taking advantage of the new Geographic Information Systems (GIS) course being offered (now a contextual requirement). We have proposed a new degree track that would allow students to complete their paramedic training within four years and receive a B.S. in Emergency Management. We have just had a new course approved for next year that will allow students to complete an internship in Emergency Management with various, county, state and federal agencies. We have new courses in Business Continuity, Technology in Emergency Management (think drones), and a Wilderness (Medicine) First Responder (WFR) courses in the planning stages. All of these courses will keep PUC Emergency Services graduates on the cutting edge.

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What distinguishes PUC’s program from other EMS type programs, such as Union College’s international rescue and relief program?

While there are definitely similarities with Union’s IRR program, our program at PUC is more focused on domestic Emergency Management positions/careers. Both programs have an EMT component that leads to National Registry and identical courses in Technical Rope and Swiftwater Rescue. IRR has an international component that we do not. We have courses in Emergency Vehicle Operations (EVOC) that lead to a Department of Transportation (DOT) certificate (how to drive an ambulance); a course in how to manage an EMS agency. Approximately half of our students in Emergency Services are members of the Angwin Volunteer Fire Department and are able to gain valuable experience as a firefighter and EMT while they are still in school. This experience is invaluable when applying for positions upon graduation. This is a very unique opportunity for Emergency Management students.

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Why should someone consider studying EMS?

We currently offer two degrees in Emergency Services – an A.S in Emergency Services which is ideal for the student who is looking for a position as an EMT, Emergency Dispatcher, or EMS manager/supervisor. The B.S. in Emergency Management opens up the world of Emergency Management which includes careers in law enforcement, firefighting, Emergency or Disaster Management, international relief, social services, public health, or medicine. Positions as Emergency Managers can be found at the city, county, state, or federal government level; with domestic or international relief agencies (Red Cross, ADRA, USAID, Samaritan’s Purse, Team Rubicon, World Vision, etc.). In the future, up to ninety percent of EM positions will be in private industry leading the business continuity programs. We now offer a pre-med option for students that wish to pursue a career in medicine. We have had several complete dual degrees in Emergency Services and Nursing.

Can anyone take an EMS class, or are they only for EMS majors? 

There are several Emergency Services classes that are open to all students – EMT I & II, and Technical Rescue I & II. Some even meet general education requirements!

What are graduates of PUC’s EMS program doing? 

Currently, we have graduates of our B.S. in Emergency Management working as Emergency Managers for the Contra Costa County Sheriff’s Office, the San Bernardino County Health Department, and the city of Beacon Hill. One of our graduates is the Emergency Manager for Facebook. We have some working in Law Enforcement, some as firefighters for CalFire. One is currently pursuing her paramedic certification. Another graduate is completing her MPH in Disaster Management (and doing her last internship at the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) in Atlanta. One of our graduates is now a Disaster Specialist with FEMA in Washington D.C. Another is a youth crisis worker in L.A.

Out of all your classes, which is your favorite to teach and why?

My favorite is probably the EMT I & II courses. These are the foundation courses in our 2 & 4-year degrees. I’m introducing these students to the field of emergency care. From these first two classes, they will use these skills for the rest of their professional career, be it as an EMT, Paramedic, Registered Nurse, or physician the ER. These students are probably the only students on campus who must be prepared to take a National Registry exam after only two-quarters of college. Many are freshmen. And yet, after only two quarters they are able to go out and get a paying job saving people’s lives. Some of our students do this each year before the end of their first year of college!

If you’re interested in learning more about our emergency services programs visit puc.edu/academics. If you have questions, our team of admissions counselors will be happy to answer them! Call (800) 862-7080, option 2 or email admissions@puc.edu to get connected with a counselor and start learning about all the options available to you. 

 

Academic Spotlight: Health Communication 

The health communication degree at PUC is offered to pre-professional students who want to pursue a career in medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, and other healthcare-related fields, but are also interested in studying communication.

If you want to work in the medical field, communication skills are ranked as one of the top skills employers look for in their recruits. Whether you are working with patients and their families or with other staff, communication is key. Students who study communication are often better problem solvers, collaborators, negotiators, and critical thinkers. 

Fast Facts

  1. 100 percent of our health communication graduates are either employed or in graduate programs for medical school, dental school, pharmacy school, physical therapy school, occupational therapy school, or other graduate programs. 
  2. Strong interpersonal, intercultural, written, and verbal communication skills are in high demand, especially in healthcare, because communication errors are often reported to be the leading cause of mistakes in healthcare. 
  3. PUC’s program is one of the very few undergraduate health communication programs available in the entire country. We are the only Seventh-day Adventist school who offers this degree. 
  4. A health C=communication degree is not an easier way to prepare for pre-professional programs since performance in science courses and MCAT/DAT/GRE, etc. scores are still the key markers for being competitive applicants. But it is one path that provides a broad overview of all types of communication skills healthcare providers will use in their careers. 

A Student’s Perspective

I really like how I can take communication classes on top of science classes. Communication classes break down everyday concepts I feel we normally never really acknowledge. I felt like comm classes really gave me an edge when it came to interpersonal or small group interaction and the professors are the best professors on campus. Communication classes really helped me be more aware of how I speak. I believe anyone entering healthcare should be aware of how they speak and how they can improve. The biggest take away from comm classes at PUC was how it inspired me to become a better communicator for a stronger patient-provider relationship. Taking comm classes helped me realize being a health provider is more than just helping patients but creating a relationship can offer the best patient outcome.” – Myro Castillo, senior 

If you would like to see more information about health communication, check out the course catalog. Speak to your academic counselor or an admissions counselor if you have any questions about PUC’s health communication program. Call (800) 862-7080, option 2 or email admissions@puc.edu to get connected with a counselor. 

 

PUC Coloring Page Partie Deux

It’s time for another edition of coloring with PUC!

Download this coloring page and color away. feel free to send us photos of the final product!

 

Pioneers Coloring Sheet 2

Tips For Successful Remote Learning

A couple weeks ago we sent our students home, asked our faculty to quickly figure out how to give their finals online, and began the process of switching to remote instruction for the foreseeable future. We are living in strange times and we are so thankful for our Pioneers family who has embraced these changes with hardly a complaint. 

Whether you’re a current PUC student or thinking about becoming one, you’re likely in the same boat, setting up your remote classroom and getting ready to learn in a whole new way. We thought it would be appropriate to share tips for successful online/remote learning.

Fun fact: PUC staff and faculty are also working from home so hopefully this will be beneficial to all of us! 

Remote learning comes in lots of forms. Some classes are taught using a platform like Zoom with regular class time, some have pre-recorded lectures with discussion boards, some will give you lecture notes and deadlines for homework and allowances to work at your own pace. No matter how your professors are choosing to conduct their classes, these tips should help! 

Set up a dedicated space to complete your work

First of all, set up a dedicated “classroom”. It’s important for you to give yourself a workplace where you can learn without distractions. Let your family or roommates know this is your classroom and you need to be allowed the opportunity to work without interruptions. 

Note: Try to add a few things that will brighten your space up! 

Make a schedule and treat your day like a normal school day 

It’s important to set a routine to follow so you don’t end up sleeping the day away even though that sounds very appealing! If you are not having regularly set lectures, use the time when your class normally meets to work on classwork. 

Eliminate distractions

As someone who got distracted by the internet about seven times just while writing this post, I’m no stranger to the need to eliminate distractions while trying to focus. While you’re “in class” turn your phone off and make sure you’re not on social media. Ask your family or roommates to allow you to have some quiet time so you can get the most out of your time. 

Give yourself dedicated homework time

Don’t let yourself fall into bad habits. Make sure you schedule a time to study and do your homework like you normally would. 

Take notes

If you’re a note-taker, keep taking them! If you’re listening to an online lecture, a pre-recorded one, or even if you’re just reading, try keeping track of important information or topics you’ll want to learn more about later on. 

Ask questions

Asking questions is always important but it’s even more important when you’re learning remotely. Don’t hesitate to reach out and ask for clarification or further explanation. 

Stay connected to your classmates  

Keep in touch with your classmates. Whether on discussion boards, or group texts, it’s important to stay connected. You know a great way to do that? Our next tip! 

Create a study group

You don’t have to be together physically to have study groups. Technology has given us so many great ways to connect together, use them! Band together and navigate this new challenge together. Who knows, you might make some incredible friendships while you’re at it. 

Stay in contact with your professor

Not everyone learns the same so make sure you stay in touch with your professors, they will be more than willing to work with you and help you figure out a solution. If you have questions, email or call them. If you don’t have questions, still email or call them. Check-in! They will appreciate it. 

Take frequent breaks

Make sure you take breaks, both mental and physical. Get some exercise, read something fun, watch Netflix, call a friend. Life is extremely stressful right now and you need to make sure you’re taking care of yourself. 

While we miss having our students wandering campus, in the classrooms, and popping in and out of our offices, we know eventually life will get back to normal and we look forward to the day we can welcome the Pioneers back to campus. In the meantime, we just want to say thank you for everyone’s hard work and dedication to weathering this storm together. 

 

Making A Difference From Within

Here at PUC, we talk a lot about being a part of the Pioneers family but what does that really mean? It’s not just dressing in gold and green and cheering for the Pioneers on game days. Being a part of the Pioneers family means knowing there’s always someone out there who has your back. It means knowing there’s always someone to offer a kind word, assist with a project, or pray for you when you’re struggling. The best part? The moment you step foot on campus, even as a visitor, you’re one of us! 

Jayana Graham had no idea she would instantly join the Pioneers family when she arrived on campus for College Days last year but Kryslyn Maldonado and Danielle Gurning did! As freshmen, Kryslyn and Danielle were no strangers to the senior-year pressure of needing to choose a college. When they decided to welcome a College Days visitor to stay in their room they also made the decision to be open about their own PUC experiences and answer any questions their guest might have. “Hosting for college days is an amazing experience!” says Danielle. “You kind of see yourself in these prospective students and you get to watch as they take in their new surroundings and start to envision themself at PUC.”

On top of making sure she felt comfortable in a new environment, they spoke with Jayana about what studying at PUC was really like and chatted about what being part of the campus body meant to them. This really helped Jayana get a sense of what life as a Pioneer would be like for her. The kindness and care they showed really impacted Jayana, giving her an inside look at how PUC students, staff, and faculty treat each other. 

Jayana is now in the middle of her second quarter at PUC! She says coming to College Days and meeting Kryslyn and Daniella was the biggest reason she chose to enroll. “When I first arrived on campus, I was a little unsure of things. But when I met Dani and Krys I felt so welcomed. Their vibes were amazing and it made me want to stay, they honestly made me want to call this school my home. So far I’m loving PUC! It was also really great to already have two friends on campus.”

What is so wonderful about this story is, it’s not even a little surprising! Our students here at PUC are filled with the Spirit. You see it in the way they smile, laugh, and lift each other up. Each and every day we are so proud to know they are part of our family. 

Are you interested in becoming a Pioneer (even for a day)? PUC hosts College Days multiple times a year. We also encourage group and individual visits. For more information or to schedule a visit head over to the PUC website!

Editor’s Note: Amidst the Covid-19 pandemic, we have canceled all in-person campus visits for the foreseeable future. While we wish we were meeting you face to face, the safety of our students, both current and prospective (you!), are far more important. Please join us for a virtual PUC visit experience on our website

We are taking appointments for regular, in-person, campus visits after May 1.

 

 

You CAN Afford An Adventist Education

If you’re a high school senior you’re probably starting to get excited about graduation. That might lead you toward thinking about college next year and you might start to get nervous about how to afford it. College is expensive. But here are three ways to make it possible.

Step 1: Apply for FAFSA

One of the most important things you can do to prepare for college is to file the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). The FAFSA is an online form you will submit each year that determines your eligibility for student financial aid. Be sure to file FAFSA as soon as possible since some aid is awarded on a first-come, first-served basis. To have your FAFSA information sent to PUC, include PUC’s school code—it’s 001258. Apply for FAFSA at fafsa.gov

Step 2: Apply for Cal Grant

Cal Grant is a financial aid program administered by the California Student Aid Commission that provides aid to California undergraduates, vocational training students, and those in teacher certification programs and can be used at most colleges in California. If you’re planning on attending a private non-profit California college like PUC, Cal Grant is worth up to $9,084 per year. That’s over $36,000 to help pay for four years of college—and it’s free!

To be considered for a 2020-21 Cal Grant award, you must complete the following requirements by March 2nd:

  1. Submit a 2020-21 Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) or California Dream Act Application (CADAA)
  2. Ensure that a certified GPA is submitted to the California Student Aid Commission 

 Not from California? That’s ok! We have a different step 2 for you! 

 Step 2: Apply for PUC’s Out of state Scholarship ($1,500-$4,000)

To reward students who choose to adventure outside of their home state, PUC presents the Out-of-State Scholarship. A student whose residential address is outside of California will receive an automatic award of $1,500. Requirements and qualifications: 

  1. Have residency in a state outside of California
  2. For students who meet the qualifications for a Cal Grant and would receive one if they were a state resident, up to $4,000 may be awarded 

Find out more about this scholarship and more by visiting our website.

Step 3. Apply to PUC Promise

PUC is excited to be partnering with Ardeo Education Solutions to offer the first-ever Loan Repayment Assistance Program. LRAP is a financial safety-net we offer at no cost to you or your family. If your income after graduation is under $45,000, we can help you pay back your federal, private, and parent plus loans. This is just for new students coming in Fall 2020. 

If you’re interested in learning more about PUC Promise or if you want to register, visit our website!

BONUS STEP: Look for outside scholarships! There are tons out there, you just have to search and apply. Here are a few options we found so you don’t have to! Check out our outside scholarship blog post.

 

 

Faces of PUC: Graeme McKelvie

Fun fact about Graeme McKelvie, his real name is Kenneth and he has a brother also named Kenneth which might be confusing so he goes by Graeme (pronounced Gray). Graeme is one of PUC’s student ambassadors which means not only does he love PUC, but he loves to show visitors around campus. It also means he has to know a lot about the college so feel free to ask him tons of questions next time you see him, (don’t do this, he’ll be mad at us!) When Graeme is not busy giving campus tours and loving PUC, he’s working towards his B.S. in management for medical professionals.

What is your dream job?

My dream job is to become a pediatrician. When I was young, I was always interested in different fields of medicine, particularly veterinary and physical therapy. It wasn’t until my senior year of high school that I changed my mind and settled on becoming a pediatrician. 

What is your favorite thing about being a part of the Pioneers family?

My favorite thing about being a part of the pioneers family is the sense of community that’s always present. People are always so friendly, even if it’s just a nod or a smile, you never really feel alone.

Where is your favorite place in the world?

My favorite places in the world are the white sand beaches of Pagudpud, Philippines and Tokyo, Japan.

What show are you binge-watching right now?

A couple shows that I am currently bingeing are ‘The Rain’ on Netflix and ‘Fresh Off the Boat’.

What is something you’re passionate about?

Something I am passionate about is my path towards my desired career. I am really trying to accomplish my goals and set up a life for myself and family that I can be proud of. 

Recommend a place in the Bay Area to visit on a weekend.

A place in the Bay Area I recommend visiting is Japantown in San Francisco because there is a lot of good restaurants and dessert cafes there which are always nice to enjoy. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How To Make The Most Of Class Time 

Sometimes the idea of sitting still and paying attention is too much to bear. I get it, really. With late nights and early mornings you’re probably tired, your classroom is warm, the idea of dozing off might seem very appealing. The thing is, you’re paying good money to be here so fight the urge to daydream your class away; get your money’s worth by making the most of your class time. Here are four simple ways to do just that. 

Be Engaged

Get into the habit of being attentive during class. Some classes are easier to pay attention to than others. A one or two-hour lecture might be more difficult than a class that requires your participation and interaction, so find something to help you stay engaged even if it’s something silly such as keeping track of how many times your professor uses a certain word or phrase. 

Take Notes 

Taking notes during class is also a great way to stay engaged during a lecture. Not only are you forcing yourself to stay engaged, but you’re also helping yourself by writing down things you’ll want to remember later. For some people, the act of physically writing things down even helps them retain that information. 

Ask Questions 

If you don’t understand something, ask. Your professors will always be happy to answer questions if you have them, even if you just need a little clarification. Not only does asking questions give you the answer you need, but it also shows your professor you’re engaged and care about their course. If you’re shy and don’t want to speak up in class, take advantage of office hours. 

Ditch the Phone

Did you know the average American checks their phone on average once every 12 minutes? If you’re sitting in class and you’re bored or having a hard time paying attention the urge to check your phone only multiples. That’s why we recommend ditching the phone altogether. Put it in your bag for the duration of class to cut the temptation. Also, it shows your professors you respect the work they put into their lectures. 

Even on the days you don’t feel 100 percent focused, make the most of your class time. Each lecture will be useful when it comes time to complete your homework or to study for quizzes and exams. Stay awake, stay focused, and make the most of your class time. If you find you’re struggling a bit with your coursework, check out some great resources PUC offers!