Category Archives: Miscellaneous

Refreshed; Reset; Re-Energized

By Becky St. Clair

Let’s just start with the whole point of this blog post, so if you don’t make it past the first two sentences, you’ll at least leave with the one thing I want to make sure you know: Things feel good here at PUC. 

Now, what prompted this statement (and this blog post) was the pleasant surprise I experienced during last week’s Colloquium. Because here’s the truth: PUC administration pulled off one of the best all-employee meeting sessions I’ve ever experienced.

For those of you who don’t know, Colloquium is a two-day series of meetings before classes start fall quarter, intended to bring all faculty and staff together in one place to engage in professional development and get a sense of what’s happening on campus as we prepare for another academic year.

And this year, these meetings were truly fantastic on multiple levels. The presentations were informative and, in some cases, quite entertaining, and I felt like they built on each other as the two days went on. The order of the presentations seemed very intentional, making sure we all felt comfortable in our groups before asking us to discuss philosophical realities and ideals as a team, and so we would walk away inspired, with action steps to move forward. 

I will take a moment here to explain the groups. When we arrived Monday morning we were given name tags with numbers in the corner corresponding with table numbers, meaning we couldn’t sit just anywhere; we had to sit at our randomly assigned tables. So right off the bat, the introverts were freaking out, and the extroverts were bemoaning the fact that they couldn’t all just gather at a table together and talk the whole time. (Don’t argue—you all know I’m right!) 

I’m not gonna lie—I went into the meetings that morning with trepidation. The emails reminding us about these meetings in the weeks leading up to them mentioned things like “team-building” and “bonding” and “activities” and “comfortable shoes,” so I was…hesitant. 

But, after a couple of hours of listening to presenters, laughing at well-placed one-liners from various presenters, and whispering with members of my table comments or questions about what we were hearing, I suddenly realized something: I was enjoying myself. 

I was loving getting to know the people at my table, which included individuals from eight different departments on campus, both staff and faculty, most of whom I’d never spoken to before). I learned that Cesar, who works in facilities, has a great sense of humor, in addition to his fabulous mustache. I learned that Lorenzo, who teaches theology, puzzles deeply over recruitment and retention and looks for ways to contribute to those efforts whenever he can. I learned that three years ago, Abraham, our cross-country coach, couldn’t even run a mile, and now he has the personal experience to empower other runners to improve, too. I learned that Erwin, who works in the career center, has a cheerful, comfortable smile that makes you feel at ease. I learned that Bakil, a biology professor, has a passion for getting prayer groups together and truly believes in (and acts with) the power of prayer. 

And then Monday afternoon came. The hour of reckoning. The moment we’d all been simultaneously intrigued by and terrified of: “The Amazing Race: PUC.” 

In those first few moments you could sense the hesitancy as administrators stood in front of the room and explained the activity. Honestly, it felt a little like high school when the teachers had prepared an icebreaker the students actually thought sounded fun, but until the “cool kids” admitted it sounded fun, no one was willing to jump in. 

And then the Cool Kids (aka: Lindsay Morton, associate academic dean) stood up and asked, “Okay, which team is the most determined to win? Because I’m going to join you!” Cheers rang out from several teams, and Lindsay hurried over to one of them.

The ice was broken. A sea of faculty and staff streamed out of the Fireside Room doors, rushing to their team’s first location. It was truly beyond anything I think any of us had imagined—in the best way possible. And I’ll admit: Seeing the Student Life AVP running up the Clark Hall steps in dress slacks was fantastic. Noticing the associate director of facilities getting a break from being on call 24/7 and having fun made me so happy. Racing to the president’s office next to an executive assistant from across campus as we playfully heckled each other (“You’re goin’ DOWN!”) was a hoot. Also, you haven’t lived until you’ve seen a group of eight college employees each shoving Big Franks in their mouths in tandem.

The overall feel of these two days of meetings was incredibly positive. Though yes, there are still challenges PUC is working to overcome, I left after the last session feeling optimistic about the college’s future (and my place in it) for the first time since those rose-colored “new job” glasses came off a few months after I started here. And I’m not the only one who felt that; in chatting with a fellow employee after the meetings, they expressed that they, too, felt positive about the direction of the college for the first time in years. I suspect there are far more than two of us who felt refreshed, reset, and re-energized.

It was a huge feat administration accomplished at Colloquium—building team camaraderie and school spirit, while inspiring us to do our best going into this new school year after the last several difficult years.

So to President Trecartin, Academic Dean Mariano, Associate Academic Dean Morton, and Associate Vice President of Human Resources Stacy Nelson: Thank you. Thank you for inspiring hope, encouraging joy, and building community. Thank you for giving us the chance to learn and grow, for reminding us of the value of play, and for reconnecting us as a community. May you and your fellow administrators have the strength and courage to continue to lead PUC charging full force with optimism and determination into the coming year.

Five Bible Verses For Strength 

With finals beginning today at PUC, we want to share five Bible verses to give students extra encouragement and strength. 

Isaiah 41:10 

“So do not feat, for I am with you; do not be dismayed, for I am your God. I will strengthen you and help you; I will uphold you with my righteous right hand.” 

Joshua 1:9 

“Have I not commanded you? Be strong and courageous. Do not be afraid; do not be discouraged, for the Lord your God will be with you wherever you go.”

I Corinthians 16:13

“Be on your guard; stand firm in the faith; be courageous; be strong.” 

Psalm 18:32

“It is God who arms me with strength and keeps my way secure.” 

2 Timothy 1:7 

“For the Spirit God gave us does not make us timid, but gives us power, love and self-discipline.”

Good luck to all our students during exam week. Remember that God is our strength and that your PUC family is always praying for you and are here to pray with you. You got this! 

FAQs About PUC Music

By Becky St. Clair

So you’re thinking PUC is the place for you (we think so, too, for the record), and you’ve always really enjoyed music, but you’re not sure what that will look like in college. Good news: We’ve got you covered. Here are answers to a few of the most common questions we get about music at PUC. The bottom line is that we have a place for you–guaranteed–and you’ll be at home here. Promise.

What music ensembles does PUC have?
So glad you asked! Our four regular ensembles are Orchestra, Wind Ensemble, Chorale, and Vox Pro Musica (select touring choir). Additionally, the PUC’s String Quartet is pulled from Orchestra members, and they perform off-campus and tour at various times during the school year, sometimes with VPM. 

Do I have to be a music major to be in an ensemble?
Absolutely not! We welcome anyone who wants to participate in collaborative music-making, and we enjoy hosting diverse groups as a result. Not only do we have non-majors playing with us, but we have several community members and occasionally some local professional musicians as well. It’s a wonderful way to connect with people you may not otherwise meet.

Can I be in more than one ensemble?
Of course! None of our ensembles meet at the same time, so as long as the rehearsals fit into your class and work schedule, we encourage you to participate in as many groups as you’d like.

Do I have to audition?
Yes…and no. Wind Ensemble and Chorale require no audition to enroll, you simply register and show up (that last part is very, very important). Orchestra does not require a traditional audition, but our director does like to hear everyone who wants to be in the group, just to get an idea of where they’re at musically when they’re joining for the first time. Vox Pro Musica requires an audition to join.

I’m a nursing major and my schedule can be tricky. Can I still be part of an ensemble?
Absolutely. We have many nursing majors amongst our ensemble ranks, and we totally understand the schedule challenge. We’ll do our best to ensure you can fulfill your clinical duties and still participate in as many rehearsals and performances as possible.

Can I take lessons?
Yes! Music majors are, of course, required to do so, but anyone is welcome to take private lessons to enhance their educational experience. We offer individual lessons on a quarterly basis in a variety of instruments–just ask us!

If joining an ensemble pushes me into overload status, do I have to pay the overload fee?
Nope! Students who go into overload as a result of joining an ensemble (or two or three) get their overload fees waived. All you have to do is talk to the music office manager.

Do I have to be a music major to use the practice rooms?
Not at all! There are several practice rooms in Paulin Hall that are open whenever the building is open, and they are available to anyone, regardless of their major or whether they’re in a PUC ensemble. If you happen to be a piano major, we have some reserved practice rooms with grand pianos you’ll need a key to get access to.

What degrees can I get as a music major?
Great question! We have five options for our music majors to choose from:

  • Bachelor of Science in Music
  • Bachelor of Science in Music: Composition Emphasis
  • Bachelor of Science in Music: Pre-Teacher Training Emphasis
  • Bachelor of Science in Music: Performance
  • Associate of Science in Music

Can I be a double major?
Yes! In fact, many of our students are double majors, often coupling music with a science discipline. Talk to your advisor about this possibility, or make an appointment to talk with the chair of the department of music.

I’m interested in teaching music; is there a way to get experience with that before I graduate?
Yes, there is! Paulin Center for the Arts is a community music program run from the department of music office, and we frequently hire college students as student teachers in this program. (Yes, for pay!) Mention your interest to the department chair or the music office manager to get the conversation going.

Are there any jobs for students in the department of music?
There are always jobs available in the department. From ensemble assistants who help set up and tear down for concerts, to music librarians who organize scores and sheet music, to recording managers who record concerts and process the recordings, to office assistants who work with the office manager, there are plenty of options. Check in at the music office to see what’s available when you get here. Want to be ahead of the game? Email music@puc.edu and ask about possible jobs for next school year. (Pro tip: We love students who get ahead of the game!)

What about scholarships? Are there any specific to music?
Oooh, we knew this question would come up! The answer is yes, we do have scholarships available. Most are awarded during spring quarter for application the following fall, and are based on leadership, academic diligence, and involvement, but there is also one for ensemble members. The Campus Impact Scholarship is a renewable quarterly scholarship awarded each quarter you participate in any of the four major ensembles or String Quartet, for up to $1,000 per year. 

Okay, be honest: How good are the music teachers at PUC?
This is such an easy question, because the answer is a loud and emphatic “VERY.” Our instructors have:

  • Toured with Yo-Yo Ma
  • Been concertmaster at Carnegie Hall
  • Conducted professional symphonies
  • Studied at high-caliber schools such as The Juilliard School, San Francisco Conservatory of Music, Indiana University, University of Michigan, and others
  • Won international awards
  • Traveled around the world as soloist, concertmaster, chamber musician, and masterclass instructor

And the best part? Every single one of them cares deeply and personally about each and every student who walks through our doors. They’ll get to know you and will treat you like family even before you arrive–and it’s a forever thing. Once a part of the PUC music community, always a part of the PUC music community. 

We look forward to having you here at PUC, and would be thrilled to have you as part of the department of music–whether that means becoming a music major, joining an ensemble, taking a composition or world music class, or all of the above. 
Still have questions? Give us a shout: 707-965-6201 or music@puc.edu.

Alumni Profile: Brenda Mohr, Serving Through Music

Brenda Mohr graduated with Music Education in 1985, and was the first organ student to present her senior recital on the mighty Rieger Organ. She loved PUC because of the beautiful location, spiritual environment, caring professors, and the wonderful people who became lifelong friends. She is now the Director of Choirs at Loma Linda University Church and loves serving through music ministry. We are grateful for the time Brenda gave us to share about her time at PUC and working at LLUC. 

You were the first organ student to present your senior recital on the mighty Rieger Organ. What was that like for you? 

I felt very proud! It was such a thrill to play the mighty Rieger! I’m grateful to my organ teacher, Dr. Del Case, for all the opportunities he gave me to play the organ for church services, accompaniment for choir and brass and my junior and senior recitals. 

What did you enjoy the most about your time at PUC?

Weekly trips to Giugni’s in St. Helena, dorm life, and time spent with friends attending Friday night vespers; and Sabbath morning worship services.

Tell us about being the Director of Choirs at Loma Linda University Church. What do you enjoy most about what you do? 

Being the Director of Choirs at the Loma Linda University Church is an honor. I love serving God’s people through music ministry in a nurturing and thriving work environment. I get to collaborate with a lot of extremely talented musicians who have a heart for worship. The LLUC Music Department staff are a joy to work with. Each person on our team are professional musicians; who strive for musical excellence week after week. I am truly blessed to be a part of the LLUC Staff.

How did your time at PUC help prepare you for your career? 

My student teaching experience at Napa High School was the most pivotal experience in my undergrad studies at PUC that helped prepare me for a career in teaching music.

What are your hobbies? 

I enjoy spending time with family and friends. Also camping, hiking, biking and travel adventures. 

What advice can you share with our students? 

Keep Jesus as your constant companion. He delights to do more for you than you can ask or imagine. 

How I Got Here: One faculty member’s journey with music

By Chantel Blackburn

As I write this, I am only 8 days away from my debut on the soprano saxophone at this quarter’s Christmas on the Hill Candlelight Concert. It’s an instrument I never touched before November and have only played a handful of times. My “first” instrument (other than my voice – my mom has said that my brother and I were “screamers” as children) was the piano. I took lessons for two years until my parents finally let me quit. “You’ll regret it,” they told me; I did not.

The last recital piece I prepared was Lady Allyson’s Minuet. I don’t remember if I even performed it but what I remember is that I only wanted to practice the piece, not the exercises I was assigned by my teacher. I much preferred playing a handful of notes at a time with our chime and handbell choir to the piano.

In the early grades we also played recorders and being in a musical household, not only did we have our own sopranos, we also had an alto that I was able to play with my class. My teacher told me that the fingerings of the alto were similar to clarinet so that made for a natural transition when I started band in fifth grade. I played the clarinet until the end of my junior year in high school when I started to get more serious about it.

I was eager to take over as first chair of the wind ensemble during my senior year; I was spending time in the practice room, and starting to take lessons from my band teacher. As the year progressed, however, I noticed I was having trouble moving my fingers when my hands got cold and I couldn’t maintain my embouchure for substantial lengths of time. There were other, seemingly unrelated symptoms too: drooping eyelids, double vision, dragging feet, and weakness in my extremities. By that summer I was diagnosed with an autoimmune disease that causes weakness in the voluntary muscle groups.

With my muscles not cooperating and trying to figure out a treatment plan to keep my condition stable, I only picked up the clarinet one or two times over the next decade or so. I spent my senior year of high school singing alto in a quartet and the select touring group, sang one quarter in the women’s chorus in college, and near the end of my time in graduate school helped prompt the formation of a short-lived church choir. My instrumental amusement came from playing hymns on Sabbath afternoons with my recorders and improving on the guitar, which ultimately helped me pick up basic chords on the piano.

When I arrived at PUC and heard the wind ensemble play Variations on a Korean Folk Song at their Winter concert that year, I was overwhelmed by distant memories of playing that very piece in high school and just had to join. I hadn’t played for so long, my clarinet case had dead bugs inside that I had to vacuum out. I tried to play on 10-year-old reeds and with a busted ligature. It was a disaster. But I was participating in music with my clarinet again and it was wonderful.

Since then, my skill has grown. As we continued graduating talented clarinetists in the chairs above me, I suddenly found myself taking on more responsibility and leadership in the section. I still have doubts in my abilities every time a new student plays their scales to warm up and struggle with physical limitations but eventually, I found myself joining the orchestra and playing Beethoven’s 5th Symphony wondering how I ended up there.

At PUC I’ve had the opportunity to perform as Snoopy in a production of You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown, sing with Chorale and Vox Pro Musica, play the A clarinet in Orchestra, tour with our music groups to southern California, and attempt a couple tunes on the Eb clarinet with PUC Wind Ensemble. I enjoy how music enriches my life and takes my mind off the daily grind one rehearsal at a time.

I’m no professional and I don’t have the discipline (or the physical ability) to be one, but in my own amateurish wanderings, music has taken me places I never thought possible. The next step in my journey is on the soprano saxophone and I look forward to seeing where this goes.

Editor’s Note: Join us as we celebrate the sacred sounds of Christmas in the 2021 Christmas on the Hill Candlelight Concert. This concert is presented twice: Friday, Dec. 10, at 8 p.m., and Saturday, Dec. 11, at 4 p.m., both in the PUC Church. Admission is free.

Chantel Blackburn is professor of mathematics at Pacific Union College.

Tips For A Great Move-In Day!

Move-in day is exciting! You arrive at your new home-away-from-home, you get to meet your new room and lots of new people, and you get to move into your new room! As exciting as it is, it can also be a little overwhelming so here are some tips to help you prepare for move-in day. We can’t wait to see you! 

Arrive On Time 

Keep note of what time check-in starts. It’s smart to move-in as soon as you can because it is a process. From checking-in with the front desk to fill out papers, to finally moving into your room, it can take longer than you think. Also the earlier you move-in, the more of a chance you will get a good parking spot.

Label Your Boxes and Containers 

If you are using boxes or containers to pack your things, label them. It’ll be helpful to remind yourself which of your items are in each box or container. It also makes unpacked MUCH faster. 

image_from_ios-1

Wash Sheets & Towels Beforehand 

It’s good to wash your bedsheets and towels before moving-in so it’s fresh and clean in your dorm room. Also, who wants to spend their first few days of college doing laundry?  

Clean Your Room Before Moving-In

Before you move your things in, make sure you do a quick clean. Disinfect your shelves, dressers, and desks. Vacuum or sweep the floor and clean your windows. Having large trash bags will also be helpful to you. After a hot summer, your room might be dusty so it’s smart to do a quick clean of your room before you bring your stuff in and unpack. 

Use A Dolly 

The dorm does provide dollies, but they are limited. If you don’t have a dolly and need one, ask your front desk. If you own a dolly, bring it with you. Having a dolly will make things easier for you to bring your things from your car to your room, especially big appliances like a fridge.  

Bring Tools & Supplies 

Tools and supplies such as scissors and command strips will come in handy when you move into your dorm room. Scissors are a tool you’ll need whether you’re opening up boxes or plastic packages. Command strips will help you decorate your room, like hanging up string lights or picture frames. You can’t put nails in your walls, so command strips are an easy way to hang things on your walls. 

image_from_ios

Have Water & Snacks 

Moving in takes a lot of time and work. It’s important to have cold water and snacks to keep you hydrated and energized during the process. You don’t want to get hangry while moving-in! (Once you’re all moved-in, reward yourself to a delicious meal!) 

Have Bathroom Essentials 

Don’t pack your toiletries at the bottom of the bag or box. Make sure you have easy access to the things you might need right away. Don’t forget to put toilet paper and soap in the bathroom right away!

Keep Receipts & Packaging

Once you move-in, you might realize you won’t actually use some of the things you bought. Keep your receipts and try not to damage the packaging boxes so you can return those items. We can all use some extra cash. 

Make a Shopping List 

You may realize there are things you forgot. You’re not alone, it happens to the best of us. Start a list with your roommate. A trip to Napa Target might be in your future.

Hopefully, these tips will help make your move-in day go a little smoother. Once you get to your designated residence hall, do not hesitate to ask the dean, RA, or dorm staff any questions or concerns you have. We can’t wait to see you around campus! 

Note: Be sure you carefully read your communications from Student Life to understand what COVID-19 safety precautions will be in place for move-in day this year and how that might alter your plans!

Decorate Your Dorm Room Like A Pro 

One of the best things about moving into your dorm is that you get the chance to decorate it! Since this will be your home-away-from-home, it’s important to make it your own. It’s never too early to start planning, here are a few suggestions to help you get started. 

Cozy Bedding 

Your bedding is what will really make your room feel like home. Invest in a bedding set that fits your style and comfort needs. Remember, you can never have too many pillows!

Table Lamp

Table lamps are great additions to every dorm room. Not only will they add extra lighting, but softer lighting as well. Target and Amazon have great selections allowing you to find the right one to fit your style. 

Rugs 

From a neutral rug to a patterned rug, buying one will add character to your room. If you’re not sure what your roommate’s style will be, play it safe and buy a more neutral one. 

Comfy Chair 

Whether you need a great desk chair, or you prefer something cozy and cute in the corner, it can’t hurt to have additional seating. 

String Lights 

Many college students buy string lights to decorate their room adding some much-needed ambiance. They obviously come in tons of shapes and colors and can literally go anywhere. It’s a no-brainer. 

Photos 

You can never go wrong with using photos to decorate your room. Stick them on your wall in a cool grid, frame some, there’s really no limit. Having photos of your friends and family is a great way to make the place feel like home. 

Wall Art 

Add more charm into your room by decorating it with wall art, like posters and picture prints. Just make sure that you use tape or damage free hooks to place them on your wall. 

It can be tough figuring out what style you want your room to be, but the process is fun. Hopefully, these decorating ideas give you some inspiration for what you want in your dorm room. 

Note: Be sure you carefully read your communications from Student Life and regularly check the Fall Campus Plan webpage to stay up-to-date with the COVID-19 safety precautions PUC will be enforcing.

Dorm Room Additions

You may think you will only use your dorm room to sleep but sometimes your college dorm room becomes … everything: your bedroom, kitchen, study area, sometimes even your gym. So you’ll want to come prepared. Here are a few dorm room ‘must-haves’ to add to your packing list! 

Blankets

Blankets are the best and if you ask me, you can never have enough. Not only will they keep you warm but they’ll help make your room cozier and give it a more homey feeling, plus, they look nice! Feeling a little anxious? Give a weighted blanket a try. 

Check out Target and Amazon for comfy and affordable blankets. 

A Fridge & Microwave 

Investing in a fridge and microwave will save your life. It’s better to have your own fridge in your room instead of always having to go to the dorm kitchen to store your food. You won’t have to worry about someone stealing your food or drinks because it will be right in your room. You will also have a place to store water and microwavable meals. Owning your own microwave comes in handy when you have those late-night craves of noodles. 

Check out Target to find good quality fridges and microwaves

A Coffee & Tea Maker 

If you are a huge coffee or tea drinker, you should definitely invest in buying a coffee or tea maker. It will save you time and money. 

Check out Target for coffee or tea makers. 

An Electric Water Kettle 

An electric water kettle is a convenient addition to college life. It quickly heats your water so you can sip on your hot cocoa or enjoy a cup of noodles. 

Check out Target or Amazon for affordable electric water kettles.   

Dinnerware & Flatware  

Having your own dinnerware and flatware in your room is useful for when you cook for yourself or with your friends. Instead of buying plastic plates, bowls and utensils, buy reusable ones so you never run out. Don’t forget dish soap! 

Target has affordable dinnerware and flatware for your dorm room. 

Cleaning Supplies 

Cleaning supplies are always a must. It’s good to keep your room nice and tidy, and having cleaning supplies will help you out with that. Buy disinfecting wipes or sprays to keep your desk, sink, and drawers clean. A dishwashing wand is also very useful when you have to wash your dishes. 

If you can’t stand your floor being dirty, you should invest in a vacuum. Amazon has a great one that’s easy to store and it’s affordable!  

Storage Containers 

Dorm rooms are small so it’s super useful to buy storage containers. Baskets, bins, and utility carts are a great way to keep all your things organized while saving space. You’ll have a place to put your food, personal items, cleaning supplies, and even clothes.

Check out Target, TJ Maxx, and Marshalls to find storage containers that will fit all your things and go with your room aesthetic or just order from Amazon. 

A Laundry Hamper

Getting a laundry hamper shouldn’t even be a question. This is a need (no matter how much you don’t like doing laundry). Where else do you expect to put your dirty clothes? Don’t forget detergent and fabric softener!

Target obviously has these too. 

Power Strip/extension cord

Sometimes the outlets in your room are either too far or in an odd spot for you. Buying an extension cord will help keep all your things charged near you and in places that work for you. 

Reusable Bags

You will thank yourself for getting reusable bags. Especially in California, places charge you for buying a bag so having a reusable bag will save you money and help you carry all your things. Besides shopping, they are useful for moving your things into the dorm. If you forgot to bring some with you the College Market has some for sale! 

A First-Aid Kit 

It’s smart to have a first aid kit packed and ready in your room. Having bandages and alcohol wipes will come in handy in the times you need them. It’s also good to have medicine in your room in case you get sick or have a headache.

Mattress Pad

If you’re a sensitive sleeper or just want extra comfort, get a mattress pad. It’ll help make your bed firmer and less lumpy. 

Target has lots to choose from. 

Shower Essentials 

Besides your hair products and body wash, always have an extra towel in case your other one is in the laundry. Also, don’t forget your shower shoes! 

A Fan 

Whether you like a breeze or some ambient noise, a fan is always a good addition to your room. 

Trash Can 

You’re going to need a trash can in your room. Try to find one that doesn’t take up a lot of space and don’t forget trash bags.

A Piece Of Home

Whether you bring a bunch of photographs, your favorite mug, or a special pillow, it’s always nice to bring a piece of home with you to school to provide a little extra comfort for the days you feel homesick. 

It’s no secret buying things for your dorm room can get expensive, so always check for deals online or in-store and lookout for student discounts. Don’t let yourself get overwhelmed with all the things that come with moving into the dorms, remember to have some fun!

Note: Be sure you carefully read your communications from Student Life and regularly check the Fall Campus Plan webpage to stay up-to-date with the COVID-19 safety precautions PUC will be enforcing.

Your 2020-21 PUC Packing List

After a quarter of remote learning it’s time! You’re finally coming to campus, now you need to pack. On top of trying to decide what things from home you want to bring with you, there are a lot of things you’ll need to buy. So to help you out here’s a pretty thorough list of things to make sure you bring along! And remember, if you forget something, you can always take a trip to Napa or run across the street to the College Market!

Room Needs: 

  • Clorox wipes
  • Hand sanitizer
  • Hand soap
  • Washable face masks
  • Medications (if needed)
  • First aid kit
  • Cleaning supplies
  • Paper towels
  • Bedding
  • Pillows
  • Blankets
  • Room fan
  • Earphones
  • Powerstrip
  • Hangers
  • Laundry basket and supplies
  • Food, snacks, and water
  • Fridge
  • Microwave
  • Kitchenware
  • Food storage containers
  • Dish soap and sponge
  • Bath towels
  • Shower mat
  • Flip flops and/or slides
  • Vacuum or Swiffer
  • Trash bin and trash bags

Note: It’s a good idea to coordinate with your roommate so your room doesn’t end up with duplicates of the same items, but there’s still plenty you can get on your own!

Suggested Items:

  • Mattress pad
  • Desk lamp
  • Desk organizer
  • Storage bins
  • Air fresheners
  • Hot pot
  • Reusable water bottle
  • Mug
  • Command strips
  • Umbrella
  • Wall decor
  • Calendar/bulletin board
  • Luggage (for school trips)
  • Phone charger

Clothes (your space will be limited, so only bring what you will wear):

  • Undergarments
  • Sleepwear
  • Cold and warm weather items
  • Rain jacket
  • Boots
  • Sneakers
  • Socks
  • Athletic wear
  • Business attire (for interviews and presentations)

Toiletries: 

  • Shower caddy
  • Shampoo and conditioner
  • Body soap
  • Hair grooming tools
  • Toothbrush, toothpaste, and dental floss
  • Lotion
  • Deodorant
  • Nail cutters/file
  • Lip balm
  • Sunscreen
  • Skincare products

School Supplies:

  • Backpack/Bag
  • Notebooks
  • Pens & pencils
  • Highlighters
  • Folders
  • Lined paper
  • Planner
  • Sticky notes
  • Index cards
  • Scissors
  • Tape
  • Whiteout
  • USB flash drive
  • Calculator
  • Clicker (if necessary for class)
  • Computer (not required! Just super helpful!)

If you’re planning to get a campus job, bring the following: 

  • Drivers license
  • Birth certificate
  • Passport
  • Social Security Number (SSN) card

Note: In general, just a passport is sufficient. If you don’t have a passport, then you will need either your driver’s license + your birth certificate or your driver’s license + your SSN card. You must bring original documents, not photocopies or screenshots of them. You will not be able to start working until your ID has been verified. Visit puc.edu/studentemployment for more information; see the Form I-9 PDF.

If you’re planning to have a car on campus, bring the following: 

  • Drivers license
  • Registration card
  • Copy of car insurance

Stores Nearby (in case you forgot to buy something):

  • College Market (Angwin)
  • Ace Hardware (Angwin)
  • Safeway (St. Helena)
  • Target (Napa)
  • Walmart (Napa)
  • Marshalls (Napa)
  • Bed, Bath & Beyond (Santa Rosa)

Banking Needs: 

  • Silverado Credit Union (Angwin)
  • Bank of America (St. Helena)
  • Wells Fargo (St. Helena)
  • Bank of the West (St. Helena)
  • Chase (Napa)

We hope you’re getting excited to arrive on campus because we are!

Note: Be sure you carefully read your communications from Student Life and regularly check the Fall Campus Plan webpage to stay up-to-date with the COVID-19 safety precautions PUC will be enforcing.

Making Friends In College

Movies, tv shows, books, social media, even college marketing materials all tell you the same thing; in college, you’ll make friends for a lifetime. But making friends isn’t always easy for people, especially in a new environment. Here are some easy ways to make friends!

Befriend Your Roommate

Let’s be a bit lazy and start with the closest person to you, shall we? Your roommate is the perfect person to become friends with since you’ll be spending a lot of time with them. Once you receive your room assignment (if you haven’t yet, you should soon), reach out! Follow each other on social media, discuss plans for your room, figure out some common interests, and jump into college life together. 

Meet Your Neighbors 

Living in a residence hall gives you a bit of a headstart in the friend-making quest. You’ll be seeing the same faces over and over so you might as well introduce yourself. Get to know your neighbors and other people on your floor. Your deans and RA’s he deans and RA’s will invite you to various social and spiritual events each week, go to them!

Talk To Your Classmates 

Classes are a great place to meet new people and you’ll immediately have something in common, course work. Some of your classes even require lab or group work giving you another great excuse to strike up a conversation. Making friends in your classes will also give you people to study with, which is always a plus. 

Join Intramurals 

If you enjoy playing sports, join intramurals! PUC has intramurals throughout the year. From basketball to badminton, you’ll get to meet so many students. Plus, you already have a common interest in the sport that will help you start conversations and if your team wins, you get the coveted championship t-shirt. 

Be Part of A Club

PUC has roughly 30 social, cultural, and academic student-run clubs with frequent activities including weekend outings, overnight trips to Albion, and the student-favorite Fall Fest event. Clubs are a fantastic way to meet people who share your interests. 

Get A Campus Job 

Working on campus gives you a chance to meet lots of people while lining your pockets! The PUC Cafe and Grind employ lots of students each quarter, the dorms hire students to work the front desk, and most faculty employ a few students to help with grading. These are just a few of the on-campus job opportunities that will allow you to get to know some new people while working. 

Attend SA Events

Student Association events are literally designed to help you meet other students and make friends. Even if you’re unsure you want to attend, do it anyway. Even if you go for a few minutes or just stand around and watch, get out of your room and make an effort. 

There will be tons of opportunities to make friends even if it doesn’t come easy to you, you’ll make them! Just keep an open mind and make a little effort! 

Note: Be sure you carefully read your communications from Student Life and regularly check the Fall Campus Plan webpage to stay up-to-date with the COVID-19 safety precautions PUC will be enforcing.