Category Archives: Uncategorized

A Real Musician: A conversation with trumpet-player Nephtali Marin

By Lewis Govea

Being willing to participate in music is all you need to be a real musician. Sixth year PUC film student Nephtali “Nephta” Marin takes us on his personal music journey that puts the meaning of being a real musician into perspective.

Currently residing in Roseville, California, Marin claims that music never made a grand entrance into his life but rather was always there.

“I started piano lessons as a kid but stopped after a few years because I got bored,” Marin remarks. “Honestly, I’m not sure why I stopped.”

After his piano journey came to a sudden end, Marin continued his music journey through his school’s band.

“I started playing in band in fourth grade, and while I didn’t have an option whether to join or not, I did get to choose which instrument I wanted to play, so why not choose the loudest?”

The loudest instrument Marin refers to is, of course, the boisterous trumpet. Marin continued with the trumpet through some of high school but then took a break and didn’t play again until after being at PUC for some time.

“I got involved with the PUC music department when Matthew Guevara [a 2020 trumpet graduate] said they needed an 8th trumpet to play the easy part” states Marin, who claims to have been very out of practice at that point and would often play wrong notes. “I call it jazz,” he asserts.

Marin has learned a lot since then, but his favorite piece of advice comes from Asher Raboy, director of PUC’s Symphonic Wind Ensemble and currently the acting chair of the department. Raboy encourages everyone to use what he calls “hairpins,” where every player changes their own dynamics in waves as they see fit, according to their own part.

At the end of the day, Marin loves to participate in making music, and isn’t that all you need to be a real musician? Marin may not be a music major, but Paulin Hall is his home.

“I love the community that the music department has built there and I’m so glad I decided to participate in Symphonic Wind Ensemble even though I might not be the best,” he says. “It’s fun to express myself with music, create new friendships, make new memories, and just have a good time!”

Being a real musician doesn’t have anything to do with how good you are on the piano, or how much theory knowledge you have; being a real musician means enjoying making and listening to music, and Nephtali Marin is a prime example of the purest form of musicianship there is—a person who loves music.

Learn more about PUC’s department of music: puc.edu/music

Get To Know PUC Church Pastor Chanda Nunes

By: Ashley Eisele

In the midst of the pandemic, the PUC Church welcomed new lead pastor Chanda Nunes after more than a year-long search to find the right candidate. 

Pastor Nunes was born and raised in Toronto, Canada, and is a graduate of Burman University (formerly Canadian University College) and Andrews University, where she received her Master of Divinity degree. She also holds associate degrees in private investigation & paralegal studies and is a certified life coach practitioner.

She began her pastoral ministry in August 2003, serving the Alberta Conference at the College Heights Seventh-day Adventist Church, on the campus of Burman. From 2008-2015, Pastor Nunes served the Kansas-Nebraska Conference at the New Haven Seventh-day Adventist Church and was the first Black pastor ever to serve in the Conference, as well as the first Black woman pastor to serve in the Mid-American Union. She was commissioned while there in 2011.

Pastor Nunes has served the Northern California Conference since 2015, most recently at the Capitol City Seventh-day Adventist Church in Sacramento, Calif. She is the first Black woman pastor to serve within the Conference where she was ordained in June 2018.

“My biggest hope for right now,” Nunes says. “Is that this pandemic will cease, and that we have an opportunity to come back together as a church family to experience the love and fellowship that we have been missing all these months.”

While Pastor Nunes is very excited for the unique experience of pastoring in a college town, the pandemic has not allowed her congregation to get to know her as well as she would like so she jumped at the chance to sit down (virtually) and answer some questions. 

What is pastoring like during a pandemic? 

Pastoring during a pandemic is a unique position to be in. This is something we’ve never been through or have seen modeled for us, so we’re literally starting at ground zero. This is the time for pastors to unleash their creativity like never before, in order that the Message of the Gospel can continue moving forward. 

How do you connect with a new community when our congregation is virtual?

This part is a challenge. I’m an extrovert and love to meet new people, so with the social distancing that we are expected to adhere to, it will now take (more) time to get to know members individually. Every week, I try to work my way through our church family directory, and make a number of phone calls, send emails/texts messages.

What makes pastoring a campus church special? 

Pastoring a campus church is an exciting and unique experience! You have great resources at hand, the opportunity to meet people from all over the world, energy and insight from all age-ranges, and the desire to come together to learn, and to lift up Jesus!

What hopes do you have for the PUC Church and community in the coming months and years? 

My biggest hopes for right now is that this pandemic will cease, and that we have an opportunity to come back together as a church family to experience the love and fellowship that we have been missing all these months.  

The PUC Church welcomes you to join their weekly worship service each Sabbath morning at 11 a.m. Join at livestream.com/pucchurch

Alumni Profile: Robert Quiroz, Born For Service

By: Dana Negro

Robert Quiroz’s grandfather, Robert Moreno, served in the U.S. Army for 20 years; executing combat jumps in Korea with the infamous 187th Rakkasans, two tours in Vietnam, and was a purple heart recipient. Quiroz was named after him and knew at an early age he wanted to follow in his grandfather’s footsteps and serve his country. Just months after his grandfather passed away, Quiroz lost a close childhood friend to an IED in Afghanistan. As he grieved the loss of these two important people, he realized now was the time for him to take action. After a lot of prayer, Quiroz joined the California Army National Guard on March 29, 2011. 

Quiroz knew of PUC but it was only while reading Fearless, by Eric Blehm, the biography of Adam Brown, a Navy SEAL who died in Afghanistan, that an idea began to form. The book mentions a young man from Angwin, Calif., and that caught Quiroz’s eye. The thought of completing a college degree was very appealing and it seemed like he was meant to be at PUC. Once he returned from military training, he and his wife moved to Angwin and began attending PUC.  

Quiroz graduated from PUC with an associate’s degree in health sciences, ’16, and a bachelor’s degree in health communication, ’19, and spent this past year working as a staff member in the public relations office at PUC. Towards the beginning of the pandemic, Quiroz received a call from the National Guard informing him he would need to report for duty immediately. He left his wife and baby daughter and headed out to help serve his country and community during some of the greatest times of uncertainty. We talked with Quiroz to learn more about his experience serving on the front lines. 

What kind of regular training do you have to do to be ready to serve at any time?

The National Guard is unique. We are dual purpose, meaning; we train for our units’ federal mission and our states mission in case we called in for a state emergency. Different units have different responsibilities and roles in case of an emergency, and it depends on your MOS or Military Occupation Specialty. My first is 88M or Motor Transportation. I joined a unit that was being deployed to do route clearance in Afghanistan. A job where you find IEDs and save lives. I transferred to that unit and became a 12 Bravo or Combat Engineer. That deployment didn’t end up happening so I switched my focus to our state mission and trained CERF-P which stands for Chemical, Biological Radiological, and High-Yield Explosive Emergency Response Force Package. It is a homeland response to a disaster, natural or man-made. The unit I was a part of was Search and Extraction. We trained to enter collapsed structures and rescue people. It was hard work, but we were able to train with Urban Search and Rescuer Task-4 firefighters from the Bay Area. It’s very important for the National Guard to work with other agencies because we augment their abilities. In the end, we are citizen soldiers and are a part of the community we serve. 

You served while you were a student and a staff member at PUC. You are also married and have a young daughter. How do you juggle your responsibilities at home, in the classroom, and work with the potential to be called in to serve with little notice?

It was tough. Especially when I first started school at PUC. My unit was always training and sending me places during the quarter. I really had to make one-on-one connections with the faculty and explain my situation. Most were understanding and really helped me out! My commitments really made me learn to plan things out. I always knew I would be away at least one weekend a month and that was the week I really needed to get all my school word done. There were numerous times I was called away for duty and it interrupted school. Those connections with the professors really saved me. 

It also helps to have a wonderful partner. My wife is amazing. It’s tough on her at times. The military has given so much to my family, but it takes time in return. I’ve missed birthdays, weddings, and special occasions. When I was deployed for a year, I missed everything! Even her graduating from PUC in 2017. That was tough. She is a champ and I am blessed to have her in my life. 

This spring towards the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic you were called in. Tell us about that.

It was chaotic at first. We had warnings that we may be called up. My unit first tapped eight people for a mission to support the Department of Public Health doing what they called “symptom screenings.” Our jobs were to screen the workers for any symptoms of COVID-19. If anyone showed symptoms, they were sent home. It was important because our locations were vital data gathering hubs that tracked resources and numbers relating to COVID-19 in the state of California. These were operating centers that couldn’t afford to be shut down, due to an outbreak, because lives depended on correct numbers to allocate resources according to the most severe areas. It was long days, but I felt like I was contributing to the fight. We were put up in hotels in Sacramento for two months. It was weird being the only people driving around since Sacramento was shut down. It was the longest time I had been separated from my daughter. I saw her twice during my activation. In the end, I was grateful to be home safe and COVID free.

Where were you sent? 

I was sent to Rancho Cordova for a few weeks. Our mission was to conduct symptom screening for the Medical and Health Coordination Center in downtown Sacramento. This center received data concerning COVID-19 from health centers all over California. Eventually, they went remote and we were sent to do the same thing but at the 115th Task Force in Roseville. The 115th were responsible for coordinating California’s National Guard response. They were receiving their information from the California Office of Emergency Response. Again, it was a logistics hub that couldn’t afford an outbreak of COVID-19.

What were you responsible for doing?

I was part of the group of eight that our company activated. I was in charge of the seven. We conducted symptom screenings at three separate locations. My job, in addition to system screener, was Non-Commission Officer in Charge or NCOIC. I handled information flowing in and out of our group. On ESAD (Emergency State Active Duty) orders many things have to be tracked daily. Food, fuel used, gallons of fuel put into the vehicle, miles on vehicles, who has the day off, who is sleeping where, among many other things. All that information had to flow up to a central person (me) and then I had to push that information up the chain of command. 

What was a typical day like?

At first, we would wake up at 4:50 a.m. to be on the road at 5: 25 a.m. Work started at 6 a.m. and went till 6 p.m. This was life for a while with no days off. During that time, we would put on some protective equipment and screen everybody who came in the MHCC. 

Once I moved to Roseville the cycle changed. I worked two days and then had one off but the actual work was the same. I also gave one of my days off to some of my crew at another location who had no days off. 

With degrees in health science and health communication, was there anything you learned in your classes or from professors at PUC that you were able to use while serving in the community?

I would actually like to thank professors Duncan, Vance, and Sung. Because of their classes, I was able to understand the various terms the personnel were using at the MHCC. My communication courses played a role in me better communicating with Army personnel. You really need to know how to approach people to effectively get your concerns understood. I was thrust into a unit where I knew nobody and only had one prior working relationship. In the end, we were part of a team, but it takes time to build that team relationship. The better you understand how to communicate across many levels and personalities the quicker you are absorbed into the team. Thank you to communication professors Rai and McGuire. Your  knowledge helped in many different ways!

What has been the most memorable part of serving during the pandemic?

I would say the people I met. They were from parts of the California National Guard I never would have had the opportunity to meet before. I met many people from San Diego, LA, Bay Area, and Northern California. It was such a diverse group that all jumped at a moment’s notice when our state was in need. It was really cool to see everyone playing a part and contributing to the success of the overall mission of helping the state function. I also got to share a hotel room with one of my buddies from my deployment. We were roomies again! 

PUC’s Department of Nursing Redefines the Clinical Experience for Students

The nursing profession as a whole is fundamentally about patient care so when teaching nursing students, interacting with patients is of the utmost importance. In the spring, when Napa County received shelter-in-place orders, the typical clinical experiences for PUC nursing students needed to be reimagined. 

Professor of nursing Tamara Tirado found an alternative to the norm: virtual clinical experiences that focus on real-life nursing issues and experiences. “It has been both exciting and challenging for students to learn how to navigate their critical thinking skills in the online environment,” Tirado explains. “Being able to integrate virtual experiences in our courses has helped us to overcome the obstacles brought on during this challenging time and still meet the learning needs of our students.”

Learn more about the department of nursing at puc.edu/academics. Our team of admissions counselors can answer any questions you have about the programs, or other majors the college offers. Call (800) 862-7080, option 2, or email admissions@puc.eduto get connected with a counselor now and start learning about all the options available to you!

Faces of PUC: Introducing PUC’s Newest Nursing Professor, Jenna Park

Jenna Park is a PUC nursing alum and enjoyed her college experience so much she’s back! Jenna is an assistant professor in the department of nursing. She started her position in July but is no stranger to the community. Jenna’s happy to be back in the Napa Valley, not just for the great restaurants, but being a part of the Pioneers family again. 

What brought you to PUC? Why did you decide to work here?

I decided to come back to PUC because I saw how close and supportive the faculty was even when I was a nursing student. I enjoyed my time at PUC and loved the community, so I knew I had to come back. Nursing school was the most challenging two years of my life, but it was also the most fun and exciting.

What is the best thing about being a part of the Pioneers family?

The best thing about being a part of the Pioneers family is I have the best nursing faculty team. Everyone has been so supportive and welcoming, and I feel like I adjusted fairly quickly to this new position. I also love how close I am to all my favorite places to eat!

Where is your favorite place to eat in the Valley and why?

Whenever I am away from the Valley, I always crave and miss Giugnis Deli. I don’t know what it is about them. There is so much nostalgia and that goodness just makes me want to come back for more all the time.

What is something you can do/want to do that might be surprising for people to learn?

I’m not sure if it would be surprising, but I am obsessed with Disneyland, and I usually go at least once or twice a year. So it’s been tough to be away from Disneyland for so long due to COVID-19, but I am happy that they are staying closed for the safety of our community.

What is one song you’re listening to on repeat lately?

I’ve been so busy I haven’t listened to a lot of songs recently, especially since I find it difficult to work or study with music playing in the background.

Who is someone you admire and why? 

I admire my mother because she came to the United States and provided for the family, even though she barely spoke any English. She was a nurse in Korea before I was born, and she came back to the career almost fifteen years later in a whole new country with different rules, cultures, and languages. She is now a veteran nurse, and she has gained respect from all her coworkers, and many nurses come to her for advice. She is the definition of perseverance and hard work, and I aspire to be like her.

Favorite movie to watch? 

It depends on my mood. If I want something adventurous or fun, I’d watch something on Disney Plus. Maybe it’s Moana or maybe it’s The Avengers. But if I want something classic, I love to watch Pride and Prejudice.

Finish this sentence: On Sunday mornings you can find me… 

Sleeping in or grabbing brunch at Gillwoods or Grace’s Table in Napa!

Let’s Stay Together

It hasn’t taken long to realize how much we miss seeing everyone on campus every day so we know this year must be tough on you and your friends. Even though we know social distancing is important for everyone’s health and safety, it’s equally important to stay connected with your friends. Here are a few simple (maybe obvious) ways to do just that. 

Follow Each Other On Social Media 

We don’t really need to tell you this one, if you have social media you’re most likely already following your friends. But try following your new classmates too! It’s obviously a great way to get to know people and an easy way to stay in touch. 

Make A Study Group 

Get some classmates together at least once a week, jump on Teams, Google Hangouts, Zoom, Slack, etc, and study! Not only will it help you with your classes but it’s a great way to chat and engage with your schoolmates, and who knows, maybe you’ll meet some new people.

Have Movie Nights 

Movie nights may look a little different right now but you can still have them! Pop some popcorn, grab a fizzy drink, your favorite blankets, and hop on FaceTime, Zoom, or Netflix Party and have a great time. Don’t forget to invite your fully little friends if you have them!

Enjoy Music Together 

Staying connected with your friends can be as simple as sharing music and enjoying it together. Send your playlists to your friends or send some songs you think your friends would like. If you have Spotify, you can even make a collaborative playlist. 

Start A Book Club

Pick a book, not a school book, and start a book club. It’s fun to read in general but it’s even better when you get to share with friends. Video chat each week or start a group text to discuss chapters.

Be A Penpal

The digital world has made communicating simple and fast but sometimes it’s nice to do things ‘old school’. Find a friend and exchange letters. If you’re like me you might get sucked down a rabbit hole full of wax seal and stamps on Etsy.

Everyone is handling this time differently so remember to check up on your friends. Nothing can replace seeing your friends face-to-face, but thankfully technology is here to do it’s best. No matter how far you are from your friends, remember to stay connected.

Remote Learning Etiquette

By: Ally Romanes

We’ve all learned a lot about remote learning the past few months which is great since many of us will continue with it this fall. Here are some great tips for proper online learning etiquette from a PUC student!

Look Presentable 

Even though you’re at home, you should still consider how you present yourself to your professors and classmates. If your video is on, run a brush through your hair, wear appropriate clothing, and pay attention. If you will just be using auido, it’s still a good idea to get ready and dressed every morning to help keep you in a routine.

Be Aware of Your Surroundings 

Make sure there is nothing behind you that will be distracting to others and yourself. This could be other people, pets, or things in your room like a pile of messy clothes. Find a quiet, well lit place that will keep you focused in class and far away from distractions. 

Mute Yourself!

Once you log in to the virtual classroom, make sure to mute yourself. Most of the professors ask students ahead of time to mute, but there will still be some people who forget and end up having noise in the background that disrupts the class. 

Don’t Interrupt 

If you have a question during a lecture, don’t talk over your professor. Either type it in the chatbox or wait until the professor is ready for questions. Some professors don’t mind students asking questions during the lecture, but it’s best if you wait until they are finished. 

Respond Back 

When your professors ask you to respond to questions, please do. Whether they want you to speak up, respond in the chatbox, or give a thumbs up/down, make sure you respond to them. 

Remember, taking online classes isn’t just a learning process for you, but also your professors. They are working hard to give you the best remote learning experience. If you have any questions, concerns, or difficulties with your classes, do not hesitate to email your professor. These are challenging times but we are all in this together. 

Tips For A Successful First Year

Today is the first day of classes and if you’re a freshman, EVERYTHING is new. We hope you’re excited but in case things feel a little overwhelming, here are some simple tips to help make this year a successful one. 

Go To Class 

This isn’t high school, no one is going to make you attend your classes, and skipping your early morning lectures for some much-needed sleep might sound like a great idea but you know what? Go to your classes. You’re here for a reason, to learn! 

Meet Your Professors

Your professors want to get to know you so introduce yourself. You will make a good first impression and if you need help in the class, they’ll already know who you are. A great thing about PUC is most of your classes are small so you’ll have lots of opportunities to get to know your professors better. We know taking classes remotely can make this a bit difficult but definitley try anyway! Send emails or schedule some time to video chat. 

Don’t Use Your Phone During Class

It’s as simple as that. It’s a bad look if you’re on your phone while your professor is teaching. Even if your professor doesn’t have rules about phones being out, it’s still good not to be on it during class, EVEN if they can’t tell you’re using it! 

Take Notes 

It’s essential to take notes during class so you remember what you learned. Your professors will be throwing a lot of information at you, so keeping notes will help you stay on track and prepare for tests. Find some classmates to share notes and study with.

Use Google Drive 

Google Drive is a great way to keep your files backed up. From writing your notes and papers in Google Docs to doing group assignments, Google Drive will help keep all your files safe in one place. Plus, it’s free! 

Eat Well 

Eat well so you can feel well. College requires a lot of energy so make sure to add vegetables and fruits into your meals every day. Drink lots of water to stay hydrated and stray away from energy drinks. 

Have Good Communication With Your Roommate (if you’re on campus)

Whether your roommate is someone you already know or a match your dean made, you need to make sure you have good communication. Living with someone can be tricky so be sure you allow open communication so you can live peacefully. 

Network 

Try to get to know the people in your department, even the faculty. Not only will this make your years at PUC better, but it will also help when you need to find a job or internship. The more people you know, the bigger your network will be. 

Keep Your Social Media Clean

Speaking of networking, you should always think about keeping your social media clean. When you start applying for jobs, employers might examine your social media accounts to get a glimpse of who you are. From Facebook to Instagram, they will see what you post, share, and are tagged in. Make sure your platforms reflect the kind of person you want to be.

Check out our social media tips for more information. 

Take Care of Yourself 

It’s very important that you take care of yourself. Besides eating well, get enough sleep and exercise. To do your very best, you must take care of yourself physically, mentally, and spiritually. Remember, you’re not alone! If you’re struggling, reach out to your RA, a dean, a faculty, or some friends. 

Happy first day of classes! 

 

Get To Know Your Student Association

Welcome to a new year at PUC! We are so excited to get to know each and every Pioneer! This year we have a great group of student leaders who have been working hard to make sure this is the best year yet. Let’s take a minute to meet them and when you see them around campus, don’t hesitate to say hello!

thumbnail_image001Lewis Govea – President 

“There is nothing I want more than to reunite with my PUC family, but I know everything is going to be different when all this is over. The incoming SA Team has the monumental task of rebuilding the PUC Family following this forced separation, but that’s exactly what we signed up for. This pandemic has strained our support systems and left us feeling alone, but I want everyone to know that SA will be waiting for you all with open arms and hearts full of love when we are back together again. We see our reunion as something to be excited for and we are ready to make PUC feel like home again. SA misses everyone and can’t wait to be back home on the hill. We love you all!”

thumbnail_Image-2Aileen Kurts – VP 

“I’m so excited to be a part of SA because I know the potential Student Senate has for making great changes at PUC. I’m ready to lead the Senate to make PUC feel like home for all students. I’m hoping to create a mentorship program at PUC so freshmen have some more guidance in what they’re doing and so they know people who have accomplished what they dream of. Senate is a powerful tool that I’m hoping every student learns about and utilizes so that their experience at PUC is the best they can have because PUC is not just a school but a place to create a family and call home.”

thumbnail_11B82805-844F-4B31-8C46-5B54A7F03BCDSebastian Anderson – PR/Marketing VP

“I’m thrilled to have another opportunity to be a leader and representative of the student body. I hope to use the PR & Marketing position to bring the whole campus closer together while helping campus culture and energy flourish. I want to do everything in my power to make sure everyone feels included, involved, and invited to everything the SA team puts together.”

thumbnail_ImageGrace Jong – Social VP 

“Hey, guys! I can’t wait for all the exciting new adventures that God has planned for PUC. This upcoming year, I have so many events planned in order to connect the students together. Stay tuned always remember to give love and give grace :)”

thumbnail_Image-1Keren Castro – Religious VP 

I’m really excited to be part of SA and bringing new things to PUC. My biggest goal for next year is really to bring more opportunities for the students to seek a more personal and deeper relationship with God while creating a stronger community through it. This past year, I was on Noah’s RVP team and we brought together Afterglow and we’ve seen amazing outcomes from it. So now I only want to expand from that.”

thumbnail_IMG-20190831-WA0008Miriam YU – Financial VP 

“I’m excited to meet everyone, especially the new SA team, real soon and also to bond with the student body. As FVP I look forward to growing in this position and meeting all the accounting goals.”

thumbnail_ADC_0034Adam Adreveno – Video Producer 

“I look forward to making quality videos for everyone to engage with and enjoy!”

Things To Expect Your Freshman Year

Starting college is a very exciting time though it can be nerve-wracking not knowing what to expect, especially during such unprecedented times. While everyone’s college experience will be different, we’re here with a few things you can almost certainly expect. 

You’ll Make Friends Quickly

Even shy people make friends in college, even remotely! From SA activities to your classes, it won’t be hard to meet new people and make friends. Don’t be afraid to talk to people, especially during orientation. Everyone is just as nervous as you are. 

You’ll Have Flexibility 

College gives you freedom. You get to choose your classes (to an extent), when to eat, when to nap, when to have fun, and so on. Having more freedom is great but be sure to use good judgment! 

You Will Get Lost (once you’re on campus)

It’s a big campus so getting a little turned around is completely expected. We’ve all been there! If you need help finding your way to class, just ask! If you happen to find yourself lost with no one around, pull up the campus map!

Classes Might Get Hard 

College isn’t easy and you’re definitely going to have some tough classes. But there’s no need to get discouraged! PUC offers tons of resources from study groups to private tutoring! 

You’ll Figure Things Out

You’re bound to have questions as you start this new journey. Maybe you don’t know what major to declare or you’re trying to decide when if you can handle a campus job. The great thing about PUC is, you have tons of people and resources to help you figure things out, so use them! Check-in with your friends, your RA, or your advisor for some great advice. 

Remote learning isn’t ideal for anyone. We would much rather have you all on campus, hanging out and having a blast but your safety is the most important thing. Remember, we’re all in this together. Your first year of college goes by really fast so take chances, try new things, and make as many memories as you can. Have fun and stay positive!

 

 

Note: Be sure you carefully read your communications from Student Life and regularly check the Fall Campus Plan webpage to stay up-to-date with the COVID-19 safety precautions PUC will be enforcing.