Author Archives: pucadmissions

Your 2020-21 PUC Packing List

After a quarter of remote learning it’s time! You’re finally coming to campus, now you need to pack. On top of trying to decide what things from home you want to bring with you, there are a lot of things you’ll need to buy. So to help you out here’s a pretty thorough list of things to make sure you bring along! And remember, if you forget something, you can always take a trip to Napa or run across the street to the College Market!

Room Needs: 

  • Clorox wipes
  • Hand sanitizer
  • Hand soap
  • Washable face masks
  • Medications (if needed)
  • First aid kit
  • Cleaning supplies
  • Paper towels
  • Bedding
  • Pillows
  • Blankets
  • Room fan
  • Earphones
  • Powerstrip
  • Hangers
  • Laundry basket and supplies
  • Food, snacks, and water
  • Fridge
  • Microwave
  • Kitchenware
  • Food storage containers
  • Dish soap and sponge
  • Bath towels
  • Shower mat
  • Flip flops and/or slides
  • Vacuum or Swiffer
  • Trash bin and trash bags

Note: It’s a good idea to coordinate with your roommate so your room doesn’t end up with duplicates of the same items, but there’s still plenty you can get on your own!

Suggested Items:

  • Mattress pad
  • Desk lamp
  • Desk organizer
  • Storage bins
  • Air fresheners
  • Hot pot
  • Reusable water bottle
  • Mug
  • Command strips
  • Umbrella
  • Wall decor
  • Calendar/bulletin board
  • Luggage (for school trips)
  • Phone charger

Clothes (your space will be limited, so only bring what you will wear):

  • Undergarments
  • Sleepwear
  • Cold and warm weather items
  • Rain jacket
  • Boots
  • Sneakers
  • Socks
  • Athletic wear
  • Business attire (for interviews and presentations)

Toiletries: 

  • Shower caddy
  • Shampoo and conditioner
  • Body soap
  • Hair grooming tools
  • Toothbrush, toothpaste, and dental floss
  • Lotion
  • Deodorant
  • Nail cutters/file
  • Lip balm
  • Sunscreen
  • Skincare products

School Supplies:

  • Backpack/Bag
  • Notebooks
  • Pens & pencils
  • Highlighters
  • Folders
  • Lined paper
  • Planner
  • Sticky notes
  • Index cards
  • Scissors
  • Tape
  • Whiteout
  • USB flash drive
  • Calculator
  • Clicker (if necessary for class)
  • Computer (not required! Just super helpful!)

If you’re planning to get a campus job, bring the following: 

  • Drivers license
  • Birth certificate
  • Passport
  • Social Security Number (SSN) card

Note: In general, just a passport is sufficient. If you don’t have a passport, then you will need either your driver’s license + your birth certificate or your driver’s license + your SSN card. You must bring original documents, not photocopies or screenshots of them. You will not be able to start working until your ID has been verified. Visit puc.edu/studentemployment for more information; see the Form I-9 PDF.

If you’re planning to have a car on campus, bring the following: 

  • Drivers license
  • Registration card
  • Copy of car insurance

Stores Nearby (in case you forgot to buy something):

  • College Market (Angwin)
  • Ace Hardware (Angwin)
  • Safeway (St. Helena)
  • Target (Napa)
  • Walmart (Napa)
  • Marshalls (Napa)
  • Bed, Bath & Beyond (Santa Rosa)

Banking Needs: 

  • Silverado Credit Union (Angwin)
  • Bank of America (St. Helena)
  • Wells Fargo (St. Helena)
  • Bank of the West (St. Helena)
  • Chase (Napa)

We hope you’re getting excited to arrive on campus because we are!

Note: Be sure you carefully read your communications from Student Life and regularly check the Fall Campus Plan webpage to stay up-to-date with the COVID-19 safety precautions PUC will be enforcing.

Roommate 101

Whether you’re used to sharing your space or this will be your first experience, moving into your college dorm room and meeting your roommate is likely to be a nervewracking experience, even if you’re moving in with a friend! Here are a few tips to help you be the best roommate you can be. 

Be Friendly

First things first, be friendly. Even if you’re shy it’s important for you to make an effort. If you’re rooming with someone you’ve never met, try reaching out to them before you arrive on campus. Become social media friends, plan what things you can each bring for the room, and get acquainted. Not only will it make sharing space more comfortable but it will help to have someone to wander campus with!

Now that you’re friends, here are some things to keep in mind to allow for peaceful cohabitation!

Communicate 

Communication is key. Try to keep each other in the loop about all sorts of things. Share your schedules, check-in with each other before letting other people in your shared space, give fair warning about pulling all-nighters.  As you get more comfortable with each other, try to let them know if you’re having a tough day or aren’t feeling well. Even the tiny details about yourself can make a big difference in your living situation. 

Address Any Issues 

If you are having issues or feeling uncomfortable about something, speak up. Usually simply addressing a concern leads to a quick solution as long as you treat each other respectfully. If you need extra help or advice, talk to your RA or dean. 

Compromise 

In case you have a disagreement, compromise with each other! We can’t always get our own way so be sure to come to a solution that works well for both of you.

Set Boundaries 

Make sure you give yourselves some boundaries. Whether it’s wanting your own space, needing quiet after a certain time, sharing food or clothes, or any number of things, it’s important to set some ground rules so everyone is comfortable. 

Pick Your Battles 

There are bound to be times where you will get annoyed or disagree with your roommate. Before you get mad and get in a fight, think about the situation and ask yourself if it’s worth arguing over. There will definitely be times where you will need to talk the situation out but if you can, take a step back, take the high road, and learn how to let the little things go. 

Be Aware Of Your Bad Habits 

The older we get the more self-awareness we gather. Becoming aware of some of your less positive habits can be a real benefit when sharing living space. If you know you have a tendency to be messy or leave all the lights on you can try and be more mindful of those things. 

Wear Headphones 

One of the best things you can do to keep a positive roommate relationship is to invest in a quality pair of headphones. Be considerate and wear them when you’re listening to music or watching a movie whether it’s late at night or not. We even recommend wearing them while you study so your roommate won’t feel like they’re bothering you.

You Don’t Always Have To Hangout

Just because you’re roommates doesn’t mean you always have to be together. You already live together, so it’s okay to have space from each other. If you love hanging out, that’s great! But if you want to have dinner without each other or have a different group of friends, that’s totally ok. In fact, it can create an even healthier friendship if you have some time apart. 

There are millions of ways to have a positive and healthy roommate relationship, these are just some of our suggestions we hope you find helpful. Keep these tips in mind throughout the year and remember to treat your roommate the way you would want to be treated. Having a roommate is a great experience. Who knows, your roommate could end up being a lifelong friend!

Note: Be sure you carefully read your communications from Student Life and regularly check the Fall Campus Plan webpage to stay up-to-date with the COVID-19 safety precautions PUC will be enforcing. 

 

Making Friends In College

Movies, tv shows, books, social media, even college marketing materials all tell you the same thing; in college, you’ll make friends for a lifetime. But making friends isn’t always easy for people, especially in a new environment. Here are some easy ways to make friends!

Befriend Your Roommate

Let’s be a bit lazy and start with the closest person to you, shall we? Your roommate is the perfect person to become friends with since you’ll be spending a lot of time with them. Once you receive your room assignment (if you haven’t yet, you should soon), reach out! Follow each other on social media, discuss plans for your room, figure out some common interests, and jump into college life together. 

Meet Your Neighbors 

Living in a residence hall gives you a bit of a headstart in the friend-making quest. You’ll be seeing the same faces over and over so you might as well introduce yourself. Get to know your neighbors and other people on your floor. Your deans and RA’s he deans and RA’s will invite you to various social and spiritual events each week, go to them!

Talk To Your Classmates 

Classes are a great place to meet new people and you’ll immediately have something in common, course work. Some of your classes even require lab or group work giving you another great excuse to strike up a conversation. Making friends in your classes will also give you people to study with, which is always a plus. 

Join Intramurals 

If you enjoy playing sports, join intramurals! PUC has intramurals throughout the year. From basketball to badminton, you’ll get to meet so many students. Plus, you already have a common interest in the sport that will help you start conversations and if your team wins, you get the coveted championship t-shirt. 

Be Part of A Club

PUC has roughly 30 social, cultural, and academic student-run clubs with frequent activities including weekend outings, overnight trips to Albion, and the student-favorite Fall Fest event. Clubs are a fantastic way to meet people who share your interests. 

Get A Campus Job 

Working on campus gives you a chance to meet lots of people while lining your pockets! The PUC Cafe and Grind employ lots of students each quarter, the dorms hire students to work the front desk, and most faculty employ a few students to help with grading. These are just a few of the on-campus job opportunities that will allow you to get to know some new people while working. 

Attend SA Events

Student Association events are literally designed to help you meet other students and make friends. Even if you’re unsure you want to attend, do it anyway. Even if you go for a few minutes or just stand around and watch, get out of your room and make an effort. 

There will be tons of opportunities to make friends even if it doesn’t come easy to you, you’ll make them! Just keep an open mind and make a little effort! 

Note: Be sure you carefully read your communications from Student Life and regularly check the Fall Campus Plan webpage to stay up-to-date with the COVID-19 safety precautions PUC will be enforcing.

 

A Real Musician: A conversation with trumpet-player Nephtali Marin

By Lewis Govea

Being willing to participate in music is all you need to be a real musician. Sixth year PUC film student Nephtali “Nephta” Marin takes us on his personal music journey that puts the meaning of being a real musician into perspective.

Currently residing in Roseville, California, Marin claims that music never made a grand entrance into his life but rather was always there.

“I started piano lessons as a kid but stopped after a few years because I got bored,” Marin remarks. “Honestly, I’m not sure why I stopped.”

After his piano journey came to a sudden end, Marin continued his music journey through his school’s band.

“I started playing in band in fourth grade, and while I didn’t have an option whether to join or not, I did get to choose which instrument I wanted to play, so why not choose the loudest?”

The loudest instrument Marin refers to is, of course, the boisterous trumpet. Marin continued with the trumpet through some of high school but then took a break and didn’t play again until after being at PUC for some time.

“I got involved with the PUC music department when Matthew Guevara [a 2020 trumpet graduate] said they needed an 8th trumpet to play the easy part” states Marin, who claims to have been very out of practice at that point and would often play wrong notes. “I call it jazz,” he asserts.

Marin has learned a lot since then, but his favorite piece of advice comes from Asher Raboy, director of PUC’s Symphonic Wind Ensemble and currently the acting chair of the department. Raboy encourages everyone to use what he calls “hairpins,” where every player changes their own dynamics in waves as they see fit, according to their own part.

At the end of the day, Marin loves to participate in making music, and isn’t that all you need to be a real musician? Marin may not be a music major, but Paulin Hall is his home.

“I love the community that the music department has built there and I’m so glad I decided to participate in Symphonic Wind Ensemble even though I might not be the best,” he says. “It’s fun to express myself with music, create new friendships, make new memories, and just have a good time!”

Being a real musician doesn’t have anything to do with how good you are on the piano, or how much theory knowledge you have; being a real musician means enjoying making and listening to music, and Nephtali Marin is a prime example of the purest form of musicianship there is—a person who loves music.

Learn more about PUC’s department of music: puc.edu/music

PUC’s Department of Visual Arts Shares the Wealth

Many classes in the department of visual arts require the use of specific, expensive equipment. While PUC is blessed to allow students access to the very best, virtual learning posed a bit of a problem. How would students complete their projects while so far away from the resources they’ve grown accustomed to using? Instructor of film & television production Tim de la Torre and assistant professor of photography Brian Kyle decided to carefully pack-up and ship super-8 film cameras to their students so they were able to complete their projects remotely. 

de la Torre has also personally sent students iMacs from the school’s computer labs, cameras, and filmmaking gear and knows his fellow professors have sent students from photography and printmaking classes packages of tools and equipment to complete their assignments. He says he knows at least one student went so far as to take an entire ceramics wheel home back in March! 

de la Torre speaks for everyone at PUC when he says everything is going to be better once all students are back on campus but for the time being, he and the rest of the department are committed to providing their students with the same level of care and attention they receive in the physical classroom. “We are making this online thing work!” says de la Torre. 

Learn more about the department of visual arts at puc.edu/academics. Our team of admissions counselors can answer any questions you have about these programs, or the other majors the college offers. Call (800) 862-7080, option 2, or email admissions@puc.eduto get connected with a counselor now and start learning about all the options available to you!

Get To Know PUC Church Pastor Chanda Nunes

By: Ashley Eisele

In the midst of the pandemic, the PUC Church welcomed new lead pastor Chanda Nunes after more than a year-long search to find the right candidate. 

Pastor Nunes was born and raised in Toronto, Canada, and is a graduate of Burman University (formerly Canadian University College) and Andrews University, where she received her Master of Divinity degree. She also holds associate degrees in private investigation & paralegal studies and is a certified life coach practitioner.

She began her pastoral ministry in August 2003, serving the Alberta Conference at the College Heights Seventh-day Adventist Church, on the campus of Burman. From 2008-2015, Pastor Nunes served the Kansas-Nebraska Conference at the New Haven Seventh-day Adventist Church and was the first Black pastor ever to serve in the Conference, as well as the first Black woman pastor to serve in the Mid-American Union. She was commissioned while there in 2011.

Pastor Nunes has served the Northern California Conference since 2015, most recently at the Capitol City Seventh-day Adventist Church in Sacramento, Calif. She is the first Black woman pastor to serve within the Conference where she was ordained in June 2018.

“My biggest hope for right now,” Nunes says. “Is that this pandemic will cease, and that we have an opportunity to come back together as a church family to experience the love and fellowship that we have been missing all these months.”

While Pastor Nunes is very excited for the unique experience of pastoring in a college town, the pandemic has not allowed her congregation to get to know her as well as she would like so she jumped at the chance to sit down (virtually) and answer some questions. 

What is pastoring like during a pandemic? 

Pastoring during a pandemic is a unique position to be in. This is something we’ve never been through or have seen modeled for us, so we’re literally starting at ground zero. This is the time for pastors to unleash their creativity like never before, in order that the Message of the Gospel can continue moving forward. 

How do you connect with a new community when our congregation is virtual?

This part is a challenge. I’m an extrovert and love to meet new people, so with the social distancing that we are expected to adhere to, it will now take (more) time to get to know members individually. Every week, I try to work my way through our church family directory, and make a number of phone calls, send emails/texts messages.

What makes pastoring a campus church special? 

Pastoring a campus church is an exciting and unique experience! You have great resources at hand, the opportunity to meet people from all over the world, energy and insight from all age-ranges, and the desire to come together to learn, and to lift up Jesus!

What hopes do you have for the PUC Church and community in the coming months and years? 

My biggest hopes for right now is that this pandemic will cease, and that we have an opportunity to come back together as a church family to experience the love and fellowship that we have been missing all these months.  

The PUC Church welcomes you to join their weekly worship service each Sabbath morning at 11 a.m. Join at livestream.com/pucchurch

Alumni Profile: Robert Quiroz, Born For Service

By: Dana Negro

Robert Quiroz’s grandfather, Robert Moreno, served in the U.S. Army for 20 years; executing combat jumps in Korea with the infamous 187th Rakkasans, two tours in Vietnam, and was a purple heart recipient. Quiroz was named after him and knew at an early age he wanted to follow in his grandfather’s footsteps and serve his country. Just months after his grandfather passed away, Quiroz lost a close childhood friend to an IED in Afghanistan. As he grieved the loss of these two important people, he realized now was the time for him to take action. After a lot of prayer, Quiroz joined the California Army National Guard on March 29, 2011. 

Quiroz knew of PUC but it was only while reading Fearless, by Eric Blehm, the biography of Adam Brown, a Navy SEAL who died in Afghanistan, that an idea began to form. The book mentions a young man from Angwin, Calif., and that caught Quiroz’s eye. The thought of completing a college degree was very appealing and it seemed like he was meant to be at PUC. Once he returned from military training, he and his wife moved to Angwin and began attending PUC.  

Quiroz graduated from PUC with an associate’s degree in health sciences, ’16, and a bachelor’s degree in health communication, ’19, and spent this past year working as a staff member in the public relations office at PUC. Towards the beginning of the pandemic, Quiroz received a call from the National Guard informing him he would need to report for duty immediately. He left his wife and baby daughter and headed out to help serve his country and community during some of the greatest times of uncertainty. We talked with Quiroz to learn more about his experience serving on the front lines. 

What kind of regular training do you have to do to be ready to serve at any time?

The National Guard is unique. We are dual purpose, meaning; we train for our units’ federal mission and our states mission in case we called in for a state emergency. Different units have different responsibilities and roles in case of an emergency, and it depends on your MOS or Military Occupation Specialty. My first is 88M or Motor Transportation. I joined a unit that was being deployed to do route clearance in Afghanistan. A job where you find IEDs and save lives. I transferred to that unit and became a 12 Bravo or Combat Engineer. That deployment didn’t end up happening so I switched my focus to our state mission and trained CERF-P which stands for Chemical, Biological Radiological, and High-Yield Explosive Emergency Response Force Package. It is a homeland response to a disaster, natural or man-made. The unit I was a part of was Search and Extraction. We trained to enter collapsed structures and rescue people. It was hard work, but we were able to train with Urban Search and Rescuer Task-4 firefighters from the Bay Area. It’s very important for the National Guard to work with other agencies because we augment their abilities. In the end, we are citizen soldiers and are a part of the community we serve. 

You served while you were a student and a staff member at PUC. You are also married and have a young daughter. How do you juggle your responsibilities at home, in the classroom, and work with the potential to be called in to serve with little notice?

It was tough. Especially when I first started school at PUC. My unit was always training and sending me places during the quarter. I really had to make one-on-one connections with the faculty and explain my situation. Most were understanding and really helped me out! My commitments really made me learn to plan things out. I always knew I would be away at least one weekend a month and that was the week I really needed to get all my school word done. There were numerous times I was called away for duty and it interrupted school. Those connections with the professors really saved me. 

It also helps to have a wonderful partner. My wife is amazing. It’s tough on her at times. The military has given so much to my family, but it takes time in return. I’ve missed birthdays, weddings, and special occasions. When I was deployed for a year, I missed everything! Even her graduating from PUC in 2017. That was tough. She is a champ and I am blessed to have her in my life. 

This spring towards the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic you were called in. Tell us about that.

It was chaotic at first. We had warnings that we may be called up. My unit first tapped eight people for a mission to support the Department of Public Health doing what they called “symptom screenings.” Our jobs were to screen the workers for any symptoms of COVID-19. If anyone showed symptoms, they were sent home. It was important because our locations were vital data gathering hubs that tracked resources and numbers relating to COVID-19 in the state of California. These were operating centers that couldn’t afford to be shut down, due to an outbreak, because lives depended on correct numbers to allocate resources according to the most severe areas. It was long days, but I felt like I was contributing to the fight. We were put up in hotels in Sacramento for two months. It was weird being the only people driving around since Sacramento was shut down. It was the longest time I had been separated from my daughter. I saw her twice during my activation. In the end, I was grateful to be home safe and COVID free.

Where were you sent? 

I was sent to Rancho Cordova for a few weeks. Our mission was to conduct symptom screening for the Medical and Health Coordination Center in downtown Sacramento. This center received data concerning COVID-19 from health centers all over California. Eventually, they went remote and we were sent to do the same thing but at the 115th Task Force in Roseville. The 115th were responsible for coordinating California’s National Guard response. They were receiving their information from the California Office of Emergency Response. Again, it was a logistics hub that couldn’t afford an outbreak of COVID-19.

What were you responsible for doing?

I was part of the group of eight that our company activated. I was in charge of the seven. We conducted symptom screenings at three separate locations. My job, in addition to system screener, was Non-Commission Officer in Charge or NCOIC. I handled information flowing in and out of our group. On ESAD (Emergency State Active Duty) orders many things have to be tracked daily. Food, fuel used, gallons of fuel put into the vehicle, miles on vehicles, who has the day off, who is sleeping where, among many other things. All that information had to flow up to a central person (me) and then I had to push that information up the chain of command. 

What was a typical day like?

At first, we would wake up at 4:50 a.m. to be on the road at 5: 25 a.m. Work started at 6 a.m. and went till 6 p.m. This was life for a while with no days off. During that time, we would put on some protective equipment and screen everybody who came in the MHCC. 

Once I moved to Roseville the cycle changed. I worked two days and then had one off but the actual work was the same. I also gave one of my days off to some of my crew at another location who had no days off. 

With degrees in health science and health communication, was there anything you learned in your classes or from professors at PUC that you were able to use while serving in the community?

I would actually like to thank professors Duncan, Vance, and Sung. Because of their classes, I was able to understand the various terms the personnel were using at the MHCC. My communication courses played a role in me better communicating with Army personnel. You really need to know how to approach people to effectively get your concerns understood. I was thrust into a unit where I knew nobody and only had one prior working relationship. In the end, we were part of a team, but it takes time to build that team relationship. The better you understand how to communicate across many levels and personalities the quicker you are absorbed into the team. Thank you to communication professors Rai and McGuire. Your  knowledge helped in many different ways!

What has been the most memorable part of serving during the pandemic?

I would say the people I met. They were from parts of the California National Guard I never would have had the opportunity to meet before. I met many people from San Diego, LA, Bay Area, and Northern California. It was such a diverse group that all jumped at a moment’s notice when our state was in need. It was really cool to see everyone playing a part and contributing to the success of the overall mission of helping the state function. I also got to share a hotel room with one of my buddies from my deployment. We were roomies again! 

The Women’s Volleyball Team Shows Pioneers Spirit

By Richie Silie 

Times are difficult and that is a fact. But even in the midst of a global pandemic, our student athletes are finding ways to be good “teammates” to our surrounding communities. 

Members of our women’s volleyball team made the decision to volunteer at the COVID-19 testing site in Yountville, Calif. These ladies didn’t just help at the mobile clinic, they also passed out food, toiletries, and various personal health items to families in need. Overcoming challenges and working as a team are part of an athlete’s everyday life so it was no surprise to see the selflessness of our Pioneers. These incredible young people lead our athletics department by shining their light “all around the neighborhood.” 

The #PUCPioneersNation has really stepped up and shown they are proudly part of the larger Napa Valley community. Though we are more than ready to have all our students back on campus and regain a sense of normalcy, we are blessed to give back in as many ways as possible because that IS the Pioneers way! 

Follow us on Instagram at @pucpioneers!

PUC’s Department of Nursing Redefines the Clinical Experience for Students

The nursing profession as a whole is fundamentally about patient care so when teaching nursing students, interacting with patients is of the utmost importance. In the spring, when Napa County received shelter-in-place orders, the typical clinical experiences for PUC nursing students needed to be reimagined. 

Professor of nursing Tamara Tirado found an alternative to the norm: virtual clinical experiences that focus on real-life nursing issues and experiences. “It has been both exciting and challenging for students to learn how to navigate their critical thinking skills in the online environment,” Tirado explains. “Being able to integrate virtual experiences in our courses has helped us to overcome the obstacles brought on during this challenging time and still meet the learning needs of our students.”

Learn more about the department of nursing at puc.edu/academics. Our team of admissions counselors can answer any questions you have about the programs, or other majors the college offers. Call (800) 862-7080, option 2, or email admissions@puc.eduto get connected with a counselor now and start learning about all the options available to you!

Faces of PUC: Introducing PUC’s Newest Nursing Professor, Jenna Park

Jenna Park is a PUC nursing alum and enjoyed her college experience so much she’s back! Jenna is an assistant professor in the department of nursing. She started her position in July but is no stranger to the community. Jenna’s happy to be back in the Napa Valley, not just for the great restaurants, but being a part of the Pioneers family again. 

What brought you to PUC? Why did you decide to work here?

I decided to come back to PUC because I saw how close and supportive the faculty was even when I was a nursing student. I enjoyed my time at PUC and loved the community, so I knew I had to come back. Nursing school was the most challenging two years of my life, but it was also the most fun and exciting.

What is the best thing about being a part of the Pioneers family?

The best thing about being a part of the Pioneers family is I have the best nursing faculty team. Everyone has been so supportive and welcoming, and I feel like I adjusted fairly quickly to this new position. I also love how close I am to all my favorite places to eat!

Where is your favorite place to eat in the Valley and why?

Whenever I am away from the Valley, I always crave and miss Giugnis Deli. I don’t know what it is about them. There is so much nostalgia and that goodness just makes me want to come back for more all the time.

What is something you can do/want to do that might be surprising for people to learn?

I’m not sure if it would be surprising, but I am obsessed with Disneyland, and I usually go at least once or twice a year. So it’s been tough to be away from Disneyland for so long due to COVID-19, but I am happy that they are staying closed for the safety of our community.

What is one song you’re listening to on repeat lately?

I’ve been so busy I haven’t listened to a lot of songs recently, especially since I find it difficult to work or study with music playing in the background.

Who is someone you admire and why? 

I admire my mother because she came to the United States and provided for the family, even though she barely spoke any English. She was a nurse in Korea before I was born, and she came back to the career almost fifteen years later in a whole new country with different rules, cultures, and languages. She is now a veteran nurse, and she has gained respect from all her coworkers, and many nurses come to her for advice. She is the definition of perseverance and hard work, and I aspire to be like her.

Favorite movie to watch? 

It depends on my mood. If I want something adventurous or fun, I’d watch something on Disney Plus. Maybe it’s Moana or maybe it’s The Avengers. But if I want something classic, I love to watch Pride and Prejudice.

Finish this sentence: On Sunday mornings you can find me… 

Sleeping in or grabbing brunch at Gillwoods or Grace’s Table in Napa!