Tag Archives: PUC

Q&A with First-Year Aviation Student Noah Noble 

Noah Noble is a freshman aviation student from Lemoore, California. Ever since Noah was a kid, he always wanted to be in Aviation, which is why he chose this program. One of the reasons he particularly chose to attend PUC is because the program would allow him to make his dreams come true and train in an environment that will prepare him for his future.  

Noah answered a few questions for us to get a glance at his first year in the aviation department.  

What made you decide to attend PUC? 

I chose to come to PUC because it was close to my grandparents, so it gave me a close connection to home. Another reason was because PUC’s aviation program allowed me to pursue my aviation dreams and train in an environment that will prepare me well for my future career.

What has been your favorite class, and why? 

My favorite class is AVIA 176. This is the beginning flying class, where you will learn the basics of flying your airplane. This is my favorite class because it allows me to explore the areas around Angwin from a view that not many get to see. We get to travel to new areas and airports, such as Yolo County, Santa Rosa, and more. 

What do you like the most about the program? 

The part I love most about the program is how helpful and close-knit the Aviation community is. The instructors are extremely helpful and are always willing to help you with whatever you need, even if it’s not aviation related. Not only that but being in the program gets you great exposure to the aviation industry. 

What are some valuable things you’ve learned from your program? 

The most valuable thing that I have learned from this program is attention to detail. In aviation, 99% isn’t enough. You always want to make sure you give 100% to everything, not only to ensure safety but also proficiency.

Can you give any advice to high school students who are interested in pursuing your major? 

For anyone hoping to be in aviation, I would say be mentally prepared to dive into a lot of work and a very fast pace. The aviation program moves quickly, and there is a ton of information to learn in a short amount of time. Another thing that people should expect is cost. Earning your private license and other pilot ratings costs a lot of money. The average price for your private pilot’s license can range from $11,000 to $15,000. 

Outside of classes, what activities or events does the program hoat during the school year? 

There is an Aviation Club called Angwin Flyers. They host many outings such as dinners, movies, and other hangouts for students to participate in. 

What is your favorite thing about being in the Pioneers family? 

My favorite thing about being in the Pioneers family is the close-knit community. You get to know almost everyone here, and they are all extremely kind and friendly. It allowed me to gain new friends quickly and build new relationships. 

Faces of PUC: Christian Junior De Jesus

Sophomore student Christian Junior De Jesus is a BBA finance major and communication minor from Manchester, New Hampshire. He dreams of being the CEO/Founder of a Fortune 500 company and is passionate about entrepreneurship. His favorite thing about being a part of the Pioneers family is being an RA, the friendships he’s made, and events at PUC.

What is your dream job? 

CEO/Founder of a Fortune 500 company

How does that compare to what you wanted to be when you were young? 

I wanted to be a computer engineer like my father, but as I grew older I realized that it wasn’t my life purpose.

What is your favorite thing about being a part of the Pioneers family? 

The RA life, friendships I make, and events I participate in.

Where is your favorite place in the world?

New York City because the skyscrapers remind me of what I can accomplish in life.

 If you had to be trapped in a movie for a day, what movie would you choose?

The 300

What is something you’re passionate about? 

Entrepreneurship and Personality Systems 

Recommend a place to go in the Bay Area on a weekend 

Santa Clara

Alumni Highlight: Dr. Carlyn Ferrari, Author of ‘Do Not Separate Her From Her Garden: Anne Spencer’s Ecopoetics

PUC alumna Dr. Carlyn Ferrari (English, writing emphasis B.A. ’06) wrote a book titled, Do Not Separate Her From Her Garden: Anne Spencer’s Ecopoetics, where she shows how Anne Spencer used nature symbolism in radical and innovative ways to express her Black womanhood, politics, and worldview. Being drawn to her poetry and fascination with Anne Spencer’s life, Dr. Ferrari saw no books about her in print- so she wanted to write one. 

Please tell us about your book. What inspired you to write it? 

My book is about Anne Spencer, who was a poet and civil rights activist. She was active during the New Negro Renaissance of the 1920s—also known as the Harlem Renaissance—and her home served as a literary salon during the period. The critics of Anne Spencer’s day misunderstood and dismissed her poetry because she often wrote about nature, so they thought her poetry was stereotypically “feminine” and not political enough. In my book, I show that she was using nature symbolism in very radical, innovative ways to express her Black womanhood, politics, and worldview. Even though she was an important figure, she is still relatively unknown. I wanted to write a book about her because I was drawn to her poetry, I was fascinated by her life, and there were no books about her in print. I wanted to do my part to make sure that this incredible Black woman would not be forgotten.

Fun fact: PUC has a special connection to the New Negro Renaissance because poet Arna Bontemps attended PUC and graduated in 1923. He and Anne Spencer had many mutual friends, including Sterling Brown, James Weldon Johnson, and W.E.B. Du Bois.

What did you enjoy the most about your writing process? What was the most challenging? 

I genuinely enjoy thinking and writing—I’m often lost in my own thoughts—and I enjoy Anne Spencer’s poetry, so I looked forward to working on this project. The challenging part for me was finding the time to write and edit! I work full-time as a professor, and there just aren’t enough hours in the day. I spent many, many late nights working on this book.

What do you hope readers will learn from your book? 

I want people to fall in love with Anne Spencer as much as I did and see what an incredibly dynamic, fascinating, and brilliant human being she was. Ultimately, I hope that people will be curious about Anne Spencer and want to read her poetry and learn about her life. I also hope that people will visit her home, The Anne Spencer House & Garden Museum, in Lynchburg, Virginia.

Who is your favorite writer? Why? 

This is a tough question, and I can’t pick just one writer because I have favorite writers for the various moods I am in or what I might be experiencing at any given moment. Of course, I adore Anne Spencer. Toni Morrison, Gayl Jones, Nella Larsen, Audre Lorde, and Edwidge Danticat are some of my favorites because I see myself in their work. I learn about myself through their work. It’s healing. Their prose is so gorgeous, elegant, and powerful.

Who impacted you the most at PUC?

John McDowell encouraged me to become an English major, and his classes really taught me how to think critically and analytically. 

I’ll be forever grateful to Marilyn Glaim for encouraging me to become a professor, and it’s no surprise that, like her, I study American literature. Her classes were always so engaging, and I loved how she provided so much historical context for the texts we read. I thought I wanted to be a lawyer, and she saw something in me that I didn’t see and helped guide me into the career I have today.

Can you share a favorite memory from your time as a PUC student?

I made some wonderful friends during my time at PUC, and I have fond memories of Friday afternoons at Pizzeria Tra Vigne and Giugni’s.  Oh, and, of course, the Friday morning biscuits and gravy. So delicious!

What advice do you have for students interested in writing and publishing a book? 

I think Toni Morrison says it best: “If there’s a book you want to read, but it hasn’t been written yet, then you must write it.” An important lesson I learned from Anne Spencer is that writing doesn’t have to be published to matter. Anne Spencer was a woman who wrote furiously every single day, but most of her writing consists of undated, unpublished prose written on ephemera. She probably wrote thousands of poems but published only about thirty in her lifetime. Publishing was not a priority to her, and she never published a book of poetry. She wrote and was committed to the craft of writing because it was important to her, not because she was seeking external validation. So, my advice is to listen to both Toni Morrison and Anne Spencer: write the things you want to read, but also write because you want to and are committed to writing, not because you simply want to be published.

Can you share what projects you have next? Are you planning on writing and publishing another book? 

Yes, I do plan on publishing again. I’m currently working on a Black women’s history project. I’d also love to venture into the world of creative non-fiction and write a memoir someday. 

Pioneers Profile: Jazlynn C. Hardy

Jazlynn Hardy is a sophomore marketing communication major from Florida who plays guard for PUC’s women’s basketball team. Her favorite thing about being a part of the Pioneers family is how they always support each other on and off the court and she is looking forward to growing chemistry with her teammates this season. 

What values have you learned by being on the team? 

To persevere even when things aren’t looking good because it’s always possible to turn things around with the right mindset.

What are you looking forward to this season? 

I’m looking forward to learning more about the game I love and growing chemistry with my teammates.

How do you balance your time between school and sports? 

I try to keep a planner to keep myself organized so I make sure I get everything I need to get done throughout my day. 

What’s your pregame song?

Anything Lil Baby. 

What is your favorite thing about being a part of the Pioneers family? 

We always have each other’s back throughout anything, whether on or off the court. 

Can you share any advice for high school students interested in being college athletes? 

Never stop putting in work, whenever you think you’ve reached your limit push some more and it’s okay to fail and try again. 

Who is your favorite athlete? 

Probably Kobe because I admire his work ethic and dedication. 

What are other things you’re passionate about? 

My friends and family.

Achieve Your Best On Tests

Sometimes students study so hard for a test and don’t get the exact outcome they hoped for. If your study techniques aren’t working for you, it’s time to change something about it. Here are ways to achieve your best on exams.

Make A Study Plan

Balancing your time between doing homework and studying for several classes can be tough. Making a study plan can help you stay on track of what you need to study and how long you want to spend studying. Note what specific parts you need to focus on and review. Either make this plan the night before or in the morning, so you know what needs to get done.

Go To Class

Skipping class will not help you prepare and do better on exams, so please go to class. Going to class will keep you on top of your studies, help you remember information, and feel more prepared for exams.

Take Notes

Take notes in class so you can look back on them while studying. Some teachers use PowerPoints during lectures, so write down everything and anything you know is important. Your notes will be a big resource to you and will help you prepare for your test.

Make A Study Guide

Make a study guide in advance with the notes you’ve taken and handouts given in class. If you organize your notes by terms, chapters, and sections, it’ll be easier to find what you need and be more beneficial to your learning.

(A lot of students use Google Docs to make a study guide. If you haven’t tried that yet, make your study guides there.)

Use Supplies That Helps You Learn

If you don’t enjoy taking notes or writing a study guide, use supplies that will make studying more interesting. Use colored sharpies, pens, and highlighters to make your study guide. Color code sections that you need to study more or will for sure be on the test.

Go Over Questions You Struggle With

When you study, make a little more time to go over the questions you struggle with. You won’t be able to achieve your best on tests if you go into it with uncertain answers and less confidence.

Work With Others

Find classmates that you would work well with when it comes to studying. Students have found that having a study group helps them remember the material and; gives them a better understanding of what to expect on the test.

(If you need extra help understanding a class, visit TLC to schedule a tutoring session or ask for help from your professor. PUC has resources to help you succeed!)

Work Ahead

Don’t wait until the week of your test to start studying. Work ahead and start writing out the information you will need to know. The earlier you study, the more ready you will be for the test.

Take Breaks

Take breaks so you don’t overwhelm yourself or burn out. You’re going to be gathering a lot of information, so give yourself and your brain a break.

Get A Good Night’s Rest

Getting a good night’s rest will make a difference in how well you do on your test. You’ll be more alert and won’t feel tired or sluggish.

We hope some of these tips help you. Study habits are important in college and it’s good to establish them early. Work hard, take care of yourself, and pray. You got this!

RA Feature: Madeline Lo 

Senior Madeline Lo is the first-floor RA for Winning Hall from Stockton, CA., studying to be a nurse. She didn’t consider being an RA until Dean Seibert reached out to her, which made her decide to be an RA for the first time this year. Being an RA made Madeline step out of her comfort zone, which allowed her to take on leadership roles, make new friends, and learn more about herself. 

Tell us about being a RA. What motivated you to be an RA?

Well, this year is my first time as an RA. I didn’t even consider being an RA, but Dean Seibert reached out to me, and after our conversation, I decided I could try to be an RA. There are a lot of duties that RAs have. As an RA, you are the one that gets to know the students that live on your floor. There is always the process of planning for the next hall/ dorm worship. Being an RA means you are a part of the staff that comes early to prep for move-in and leaves school after everyone has gone home for break.

What values have you learned by being an RA?

Being able to work within a team and creating a sense of community are values I’ve learned as an RA. My partner and I have held a couple of hall worships, and we love to do artsy things. It allows us to wind down from our busy day and just relax. It’s very therapeutic!

How do you balance school and work?

Being an RA is a huge responsibility. You have to learn to prioritize your classes and activities. I try to find a balance between my duties as an RA and my school work by writing down the things I need to do on my weekly schedule and also being flexible when things change. I find that working on homework during the day is better so that I can manage other things later in the day.

Can you share with us the most challenging thing about being an RA? What do you enjoy the most about your job?

Being an RA for me means getting out of my comfort zone. It has allowed me to take on roles as a leader and facilitator. I’ve made new friends while learning new things about myself. I’ve enjoyed communicating with my residents and getting to know them. I love doing room checks at the end of the day and just seeing how everyone’s doing.

How do you incorporate spiritual life with your residents?

My RA partner and I have hall worship every Wednesday, where we incorporate devotions, prayers and converse with our residents. We also have dorm worships on Thursdays, where the residents in the building can come and worship as a whole. When I do room checks, I ask my residents if they have prayer requests. Asking those questions lets them know that someone is praying for them.

How do you build a community in your hall, and with other residents?

We schedule hall worship so the residents can become familiar with each other. I think seeing a familiar face during worship and on campus allows them to connect and build a community.

What advice would you give to someone interested in becoming a RA?

I would say, if the opportunity comes, take it. You get to meet new people and organize events for your residents. You can gain valuable experiences. And the best part is you get to have your own room!

What is your favorite thing about being a part of the Pioneers family?

My favorite thing about being a part of the Pioneer family is that the community is so welcoming and warm. I was coming into this position as a newbie and there were so many people that were helpful and just wanted me to succeed.

What does being an RA mean to you?

To me personally, being an RA means having to be available at all times for my residents and creating an accepting environment that promotes a sense of community.

Alumni Profile: Alex Chang, Publisher of ‘Your Corner’ 

PUC alum Alex Chang (B.S. in Chemistry with a Biochemistry Emphasis ‘19) recently published a book titled, Your Corner. The book is about his experience with missions- including stories from his time as a PUC student missionary. After Alex’s first year as a missionary, he received great advice, mentors, teachers, lessons, and experiences he felt might be beneficial to share- so Alex started writing during his first year of medical school and finished writing after three years. Your Corner shares Alex’s experience as a student missionary and is intended to inspire people towards the global and local mission, as well as a closer walk with good.

Tell us about your book. What inspired you to write and publish it? 

Everyone has a corner. It may be comprised of friends, family, church members, classmates, local community (even including the cashier at your grocery store), or a global community. I believe that God has called everyone to be missionaries. All are local missionaries. Some are called globally as well. In this book are stories from the mission field, thoughts on how to optimize a local or global missions experience, and inspiration to follow God’s calling and purpose for our lives.

This book can be used as a devotional book to prepare student missionaries for their service, to help guide local and global missionaries, or for those simply interested in reading about the experiences and lessons a student missionary on the island of Pohnpei learned after two years of service.

Additionally, I wanted to create a book that would help both local and global missionaries in each season as they prepare for their ministry, while they are involved with it, and once they are done with their ministry or time abroad. At the end of the day, my hope is that this book is an inspiration to embrace our God-given calling to be missionaries, either local, global, or both.

You include stories from your time as a PUC student missionary. Who encouraged you to be a student missionary? 

I believe it actually started multiple generations ago. My great-great-grandfather on my mom’s side and my great-grandfather on my dad’s side were missionaries. My grandfather on my dads was a missionary for multiple decades in Southeast Asia, and my father was a mission trip leader for our local church. Missions have always been engrained into our family identity and culture. The seed for serving as a student missionary was watered early from stories shared by my youth pastor in 4th grade, Garrison Chaffee. He shared stories of his time on the islands as a student missionary. This in combination with mission spotlight at church, church presentations of recent mission trips, student missionary presentations at Leoni Meadows, and eight short term-mission trips my family took me on really grew my passion for missions. 

What are your best memories of being a PUC student missionary? 

The exciting memories I love to share are swimming with manta rays, breathtaking sunsets with colors I feel like I had never seen before, racing dolphins on our boat, drinking fresh coconuts on screensaver beaches, and experiencing bioluminescent water while stargazing with basically zero light pollution. The deep, meaningful memories that come to mind are moments laughing with my students, playing ocean tag on an island with my senior class, being a human jungle gym at recess for the elementary students, singing songs with the high school for chapel, and hanging out with the 16 or so student missionaries every single day.

How did your time at PUC impact your spiritual life? 

PUC had a massive impact on my spiritual life. I always share with others that one of PUC’s greatest strengths was its support of its students in ministry. PUC made it very easy to get involved with worship music, spiritual leadership, or even start new programs or churches. A couple of faculty come to mind that played a big role in my spiritual development such as Jim Roy, Pastor Jonathan Henderson, Pastor Kent Rufo, Pastor Mark Witas, Pastor David Carreon, Fabio Maia, and so many other faculty. We had incredible support during the time we started the student-led church, “The 12”, and I had incredible support and mentorship not only in my spiritual life but also in my academics and how that affected my decision to be an SM. I used to meet with Kent Davis with ideas of finishing college a year early so I could go as an SM and finish in four years. Dr. Davis always responded with a wise, personally life-changing phrase, “What’s the rush?” I ended up staying an extra year in the mission field, met my now-fiancé that second year, and made even more lifelong memories and friendships. My time at PUC was filled with an amazing culture of passionately pursuing God together as a school. Vespers, church services, dorm worships, and the faculty all were very influential for me.

What advice do you have for students interested in being a missionary? 

Being an SM was hands-down the best two years of my life. My time as a student missionary gave me purpose, passion, direction, growth, lessons, experiences, and friendships that have filled my life to the brim and overflowing. In my opinion, the question is not “whether or not to be a student missionary”, but “where are you going to serve as a missionary.” Other than choosing to follow Jesus, I don’t believe there is a better decision than to choose to be a missionary. I would encourage anyone interested and those who had never considered it to pray about potentially serving as a student missionary.

What have you been up to since graduating from PUC? 

I am currently in my last year of medical school at Loma Linda University. I am applying to an Orthopedic Surgery residency this year, and I have dreams of returning to the mission field to serve as a doctor. I am getting married in the spring of 2023 and am excited for what God has in store for the next chapters of my life!

Faces of PUC: Allison Arenas-Sosa

Coming from Omaha, Nebraska, is freshman business major Allison Arenas-Sosa. While looking at Adventist colleges, she wanted to find a school where she could continue growing spiritually and close to God. Allison shared, “The help I received to be here was always very attentive to me and that made me want to be at PUC.” 

What is your dream job? 

It is to work in an office where I can do what I like to do and enjoy doing it, in a pleasant and healthy environment.

How does that compare to what you wanted to be when you were young? 

When I was younger, I wanted to be a teacher because my mom studied that, and when I was teaching, I helped her, and I liked what I was doing, but later I discovered other things and new hobbies that made me change my mind.

What is your favorite thing about being a part of the Pioneers family? 

That they are always willing to help others in any way they can, and the joy they share.

Where is your favorite place in the world?

“Mar Azul” is a beach in the city where I grew up in Mexico. When I’m there, it’s like escaping from the world. Everyone is carefree, enjoying the sea, the company, the sunsets, and the atmosphere in general. It’s very relaxing and gives me peace.

If you had to be trapped in a movie for a day, what movie would you choose?

Back to the Future, to be able to travel in time.

What is something you’re passionate about? 

Listening to music, taking pictures, and painting. I love to do any of the 3, they bring me moments of happiness in which I feel good about myself.

Q&A with PUC’s Pre-Med/Dent Club President Emily Smith

Pre-med/dent Club President Emily Smith is a senior majoring in management for medical professionals. She joined the club as a freshman in 2019, which at the time was more active but had to stop events due to COVID. Once PUC opened the campus to all students this year, Emily ran for president to get the club running again. With many pre-med/dent students, Emily wants to create a club to make their educational journey more fun. 

Tell us about the Pre-Med/Dent Club. 

The Pre-med/Pre-dent club’s purpose is to provide resources and activities that prepare Pre-med/Pre-dent students for graduate school. We bring in speakers that talk about the admissions process and answer any questions students may have. We also have several fun activities such as trivia/game nights, movie nights, suturing tutorials, and health fairs. 

What motivated you to run for president? What do you enjoy the most about being president? 

I joined the club in 2019 as a freshman when it was much more active. The club stopped having events once COVID hit since we could no longer meet. I saw this year as an opportunity to get the club up and running again, so I ran for president. My most favorite part about being president is interacting with all the new pre-med/pre-dent students. I like being able to give them advice on courses, the admissions process, etc. Also, all the newbies have so much energy so it is refreshing!

What activities or events does the club have planned for this year?

We have plans for a few speakers this year. Speaking of which, we have a podiatrist speaking on November 15th via zoom, so please check our Instagram page for updates about the meeting info. We also are having a pre-vespers at the President Trecartin’s house on November 11th, so please come! The club has plans for a suturing tutorial, a collab with NSA to learn some basic skills (taking vitals, injections, etc), game/trivia nights, movie nights, etc. Make sure to follow the club on Instagram for event announcements. We are also open to any suggestions from students, so do not be afraid to reach out!

What are your goals for the club?

My hope is to make more students aware of the club. We have a large number of pre-med/pre-dent students on campus, so I want to create a club that can make the pre-med/pre-dent journey a little more fun. 

What is your favorite thing about being a part of the Pre-Med/Dent Club?

I like that you get to meet other students that are going through the same things you are. It can be rough especially if you are the first in your family to take this academic route. Meeting other students that are on the same journey makes things a little more manageable. 

To future students who are interested in joining, what would you like them to know? 

Join! We would love to have you! I hope to see you at our upcoming events!

Come Transfer To PUC

Interested in transferring schools? Come to PUC! Our lively community is filled with friendly, kind-hearted people who are ready to help you pursue your passions, grow spiritually, and get you to where you want to be. Here are other reasons why you should consider transferring to PUC. 

PUC has over 70 degrees and programs 

Whether you’re undecided, switching programs, continuing your desired major, or interested in taking up a minor, PUC has a range of degrees and programs. Once we receive your transcripts, we’ll assist you in getting into classes.

Gain A Trustee Advisor 

You will have an academic advisor from your program who knows everything about your major and will always be there for you. They are dedicated to helping you navigate your college experience and set you on the right path for your desired career. 

Have A Support Team 

Just as your advisor will always help you out, so will others. The Teaching and Learning Center offers tutoring and advising services, and the Career and Counseling Center provides career tests and counselors you can meet with for free. 

Network and Build Connections 

Another thing your advisor will assist you in is building your connections and getting you out there to network. From the tech industry of Google to the marketing world of Airbnb to the medical field of Loma Linda University, PUC is well connected to people from all over the world working in different areas of work. 

Grow Spiritually 

Our student’s spiritual development is just as important as their academic progress. PUC is devoted to having students gain a spiritual experience and grow closer to God every day. Students join PUC chaplain Kent Rufo on outreaches and lead worship services and events for everyone to enjoy. Every staff and faculty member is also there to help you on your spiritual journey. 

Make Lifelong Friendships 

Through your department, intramurals, clubs, events, work and living in the dorm, you will meet so many people here and most of them will be your lifelong friends. The relationships you make here will leave a beautiful mark on your college experience and life.

Our transfer student counselor, Kharolynn Pascual Smith, is committed to helping students through the transfer process. You can contact her at kharolynn@puc.edu or call (800) 862-7080, option 2, with any questions or concerns you have. No matter where you are in your program, you can still transfer with the credits you have. Visit our website to get more information. We hope you join our Pioneer family!